2003 Seattle Annual Meeting (November 2–5, 2003)
Paper No. 56-29
Presentation Time: 1:00 PM-3:45 PM

THE LILLY ARBOR PROJECT: PROMOTING SCIENCE-BASED ENVIRONMENTAL EDUCATION AND OUTREACH WITHIN AN URBAN RIPARIAN SETTING

SALAZAR, Kara A.1, TEDESCO, Lenore P.2, ATEKWANA, Eliot A.3, SWOPE, R. Jeffrey3, PACHUT, Joseph F. Jr3, LINDSEY, Greg4, HERNLY, F. Vincent5, and HALL, Bob E.6, (1) Center for Earth and Environmental Science, Department of Geology, Indiana University - Purdue University Indianapolis, 723 West Michigan Street, SL118, Indianapolis, IN 46202-5132, salazark@iupui.edu, (2) Geology, Indiana Univ, Purdue Univ Indianapolis, 723 West Michigan St. SL 118, Indianapolis, IN 46202, (3) Department of Geology, Indiana University - Purdue University Indianapolis, 723 West Michigan Street, SL118, Indianapolis, IN 46202-5132, (4) Center for Urban Policy and the Environment, School of Public and Environmental Affairs, Indiana Univ - Purdue Univ Indianapolis, 342 North Senate Avenue, Indianapolis, IN 46204-1708, (5) Department of Geology, Indiana Univ - Purdue Univ Indianapolis, 723 West Michigan Street, SL118, Indianapolis, IN 46202-5132, (6) Center for Earth and Environmental Science, Department of Geology, Indiana Univ - Purdue Univ Indianapolis, 723 West Michigan Street, SL118, Indianapolis, IN 46202

Through collaboration with local, state, and federal government agencies, private businesses, and nonprofit organizations, the Indiana University~Purdue University Indianapolis (IUPUI) Center for Earth and Environmental Science (CEES) implemented an urban riparian restoration project along eight acres of the White River in Indianapolis, Indiana. The Lilly ARBOR project was designed for use as an experiential research and education site that teaches and promotes environmental stewardship. The educational objectives are to a) increase the number of faculty and students at IUPUI involved in experiential learning, b) engage students in the design, implementation, and monitoring of a restoration project, and c) to provide a site for educational outreach for citizens, K-12 educators, and environmental professionals. Simultaneously, the project's research objectives are to a) provide a research site for long-term study (at least 5 years) of river and riparian processes, b) to evaluate restoration procedures utilized by restoration managers, and c) to monitor the growth and development of an urban riparian forest.

Environmental education and outreach programs have been designed to reach K-12 teachers and students, the campus and surrounding community, and environmental professionals. Through teacher training workshops, children’s camps, and school group instruction, the Lilly ARBOR project site provides an outdoor field experience with a watershed, a riparian system, and wetlands as well as exposure to research techniques on topics such as population studies of floras and faunas and water quality analysis. Through the CEES service learning program, IUPUI faculty and staff from four schools and professional environmental managers work with area high school and middle school students, IUPUI students, other Indianapolis-area university students, and community members to conduct research and maintain the restoration. Business groups and environmental professionals also utilize the restoration site for employee volunteer days and group tours. The interdisciplinary collaboration and use of the Lilly ARBOR project has permitted several hundred individuals to contribute to the research and maintenance of the site while educating them about the importance of maintaining biological diversity and participating in environmental stewardship.

2003 Seattle Annual Meeting (November 2–5, 2003)
Session No. 56--Booth# 29
Using Data to Teach Earth Processes: An Illustrated Community Discussion (Posters). Special Session in Support of the NAGT/DLESE "On the Cutting Edge" Program
Washington State Convention and Trade Center: Hall 4-F
1:00 PM-3:45 PM, Sunday, November 2, 2003

Geological Society of America Abstracts with Programs, Vol. 35, No. 6, September 2003, p. 119

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