2003 Seattle Annual Meeting (November 25, 2003)
Session No. 70 Monday, November 3, 2003
8:00 AM-12:00 PM, Washington State Convention and Trade Center: 618/619/620

T82. Ocean Chemistry Through the Mesozoic and Cenozoic

Adina Paytan and Christina De La Rocha, Presiding
 Paper #Start Time
70-18:00 AM WHY DID THE COMPOSITION OF SEAWATER VARY DURING THE PHANEROZOIC?: HOLLAND, Heinrich D., Earth and Planetary Sciences, Harvard Univ, 20 Oxford Street, Cambridge, MA 02138, holland@eps.harvard.edu.
70-28:20 AM RAMIFICATIONS OF SECULAR VARIATIONS IN SEAWATER CHEMISTRY: LOWENSTEIN, Tim K.1, DEMICCO, Robert V.1, TIMOFEEFF, Michael N.1, HARDIE, Lawrence A.2, and BRENNAN, Sean T.3, (1) Department of Geological Sciences, State Univ of New York, Binghamton, NY 13902, lowenst@binghamton.edu, (2) Morton K Blaustein Department of Earth & Planetary Sciences, Johns Hopkins Univ, Baltimore, MD 21218, (3) U.S. Geol Survey, MS 956, National Center, 12201 Sunrise Valley Drive, Reston, VA 20192
70-38:40 AM PREDICTION OF THE SECULAR VARIATION IN SEAWATER CHEMISTRY OVER THE PAST 2.8 GA: A COMPARISON OF PHANEROZOIC AND PRECAMBRIAN SEAWATER: HARDIE, Lawrence A., Morton K Blaustein Department of Earth & Planetary Sciences, Johns Hopkins Univ, Baltimore, MD 21218, hardie@ekman.eps.jhu.edu.
70-48:55 AM LINKING MICROBIAL DOLOMITE FORMATION AND GLOBAL BIOGEOCHEMICAL CYCLES IN THE PHANEROZOIC: MCKENZIE, Judith A.1, VASCONCELOS, Crisogono1, and BURNS, Stephen J.2, (1) Geological Institute, Dept. of Earth Sciences, ETH-Zurich, Sonneggstr. 5, Zurich, 8092, Switzerland, sediment@erdw.ethz.ch, (2) Department of Geosciences, Univ of Massachusetts, Amherst, Morrill Science Center, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01002
70-59:10 AM VISIONS OF ICE SHEETS IN THE LATE CRETACEOUS GREENHOUSE WORLD: MILLER, Kenneth G.1, WRIGHT, James D.2, BROWNING, James V.1, KOMINZ, Michelle A.3, and SUGARMAN, Peter J.4, (1) Department of Geological Sciences, Rutgers, The State Univ of New Jersey, 610 Taylor Rd, Piscataway, NJ 08854-8066, kgm@rci.rutgers.edu, (2) Department of Geological Sciences, Rutgers Univ, 610 Taylor Rd, Piscataway, NJ 08054, (3) Dept. of Geosciences, Western Michigan Univ, Kalamazoo, MI 49008-5150, (4) New Jersey Geol Survey, P.O. Box 427, Trenton, NJ 08625
70-69:25 AM DEATH BY HYDROGEN SULFIDE: A KILL MECHANISM FOR THE END-PERMIAN MASS EXTINCTION: KUMP, Lee R., NASA Astrobiology Institute and Department of Geosciences, Penn State, 535 Deike Bldg, University Park, PA 16802, lkump@psu.edu, PAVLOV, Alexander, LASP, Univ of Colorado, Duane Physics Building, Room D221, 392 UCB, Boulder, CO 80309, ARTHUR, Michael, NASA Astrobiology Institute and Dept. of Geosciences, The Pennsylvania State Univ, 538 Deike Building, University Park, PA 16802, KATO, Yashuhiro, Department of Geosystem Engineering, Univ of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, 113-8656, Japan, and RICCARDI, Anthony, Department of Geosciences, The Pennsylvania State Univ, 513 Deike Bldg, University Park, PA 16820
70-79:40 AM ATMOSPHERIC PCO2 SINCE 60 MA FROM RECORDS OF SEAWATER PH, CALCIUM, AND PRIMARY CARBONATE MINERALOGY: DEMICCO, Robert V., Dept. of Geological Sciences and Environmental Studies, Binghamton Univ, Binghamton, NY 13902-6000, demicco@binghamton.edu, LOWENSTEIN, Tim K., Department of Geological Sciences, Binghamton Univ, Binghamton, NY 13901, and HARDIE, Lawrence A., Morton K Blaustein Department of Earth & Planetary Sciences, Johns Hopkins Univ, Baltimore, MD 21218
70-89:55 AM SUBMARINE HYDROTHERMAL ACTIVITY AND SECULAR CHANGES IN MID-CRETACEOUS SEAWATER CHEMISTRY: MACCONNELL, Adam B., Department of Geosciences, Univ of Massachusetts at Amherst, Morrill Science Center, Amherst, MA 01003, adam@geo.umass.edu, LECKIE, R. Mark, Department of Geosciences, Univ of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003, and HALL, Jenney, Geology & Geophysics Department, Yale Univ, Kline Geology Laboratory, 210 Whitney Ave, New Haven, CT 06511
70-910:10 AM WHAT CAN WE SEE: SENSITIVITY OF SILICON ISOTOPES TO PERTURBATIONS OF THE SILICA CYCLE: DE LA ROCHA, Christina L. and BICKLE, Mike J., Department of Earth Sciences, Univ of Cambridge, Downing St, Cambridge, CB2 3EQ, christina00@esc.cam.ac.uk
70-1010:30 AM SECULAR CHANGES IN THE MODES OF CARBONATE DEPOSITION AND THE STABILITY OF THE CLIMATE SYSTEM: RIDGWELL, Andy J., Department of Earth Sciences, Univ of California - Riverside, Riverside, CA 92521, andyr@citrus.ucr.edu and KENNEDY, Martin J., Department of Earth Science, Univ of California, Riverside, Geology Building, Riverside, CA 92521
70-1110:45 AM BIOLOGICAL OVERPRINT OF THE GEOLOGICAL CARBON CYCLE: KATZ, Miriam E.1, WRIGHT, James D.1, MILLER, Kenneth G.1, CRAMER, Benjamin S.2, FENNEL, Katja3, and FALKOWSKI, Paul G.4, (1) Dept. of Geological Sci, Rutgers Univ, 610 Taylor Rd, Piscataway, NJ 08854, mimikatz@rci.rutgers.edu, (2) Institute of Geology and Paleontology, Tohoku Univ, Aoba, Aramaki, Sendai 980-8578, Japan, (3) Institute of Marine and Coastal Sciences, Rutgers Univ, 71 Dudley Road, New Brunswick, NJ 08901-8521, (4) Dept of Geology, and Institute of Marine and Coastal Sciences, Rutgers Univ, New Brunswick, NJ 08901
70-1211:00 AM CHANGES IN THE SR/CA AND MG/CA RATIOS OF CRETACEOUS SEAWATER DERIVED FROM THE COMPOSITION OF BIOLOGICAL LOW-MG CALCITE: STEUBER, Thomas and RAUCH, Markus, Institute of Geology, Mineralogy and Geophysics, Ruhr Univ, Universitaetsstrasse 150, Bochum, 44801, Germany, thomas.steuber@ruhr-uni-bochum.de
70-1311:15 AM MODERN HIGH-MAGNESIUM CALCITE ORGANISMS PRODUCE LOW-MAGNESIUM CALCITE IN EXPERIMENTAL MID-CRETACEOUS SEAWATER: RIES, Justin B., Morton K. Blaustein Department of Earth & Planetary Sciences, Johns Hopkins Univ, Baltimore, MD 21218, riesjustin@hotmail.com.
70-1411:30 AM NANNOFOSSIL CARBONATE FLUXES DURING THE EARLY CRETACEOUS: PHYTOPLANKTON RESPONSE TO NUTRIFICATION EPISODES, ATMOSPHERIC CO2 AND ANOXIA: ERBA, Elisabetta, Earth Sciences Department, Univ of Milan, via Mangiagalli 34, Milano, 20133, Italy, elisabetta.erba@unimi.it and TREMOLADA, Fabrizio, Department of Geosciences, Pennsylvania State Univ, Deike Building 503, University Park, PA 16802, fabrizio.tremolada@unimi.it
70-1511:45 AM CONSTRAINING THE CONTROLS ON CARBONATE ACCUMULATION IN DEEP SEA SEQUENCES: A GLOBAL DISSOLUTION EVENT IN THE EARLY LATE PALEOCENE: BRALOWER, Timothy J.1, ROEHL, Ursula2, PETRIZZO, Maria Rose3, ZACHOS, James4, PREMOLI-SILVA, Isabella3, and THOMAS, Deborah5, (1) Geosciences, Pennsylvania State Univ, University Park, PA 16802, bralower@geosc.psu.edu, (2) Geosciences, Bremen Univ, DFG Research Center for Ocean Margins (RCOM), Bremen, 28334, Germany, (3) Earth Sciences, Univ of Milan, Milan, 20133, Italy, (4) Earth Sciences, Univ of California, Santa Cruz, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95064, (5) Geological Sciences, Univ of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599

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