2004 Denver Annual Meeting (November 7–10, 2004)
Session No. 22 Sunday, November 7, 2004
8:00 AM-12:00 PM, Colorado Convention Center: Exhibit Hall

Paleontology (Posters) I: Paleoecology

 Paper #Booth #
22-1Paper Withdrawn
22-21LOWER-MIDDLE CAMBRIAN THROMBOLITES FROM THE CARRARA FORMATION, SOUTHERN GREAT BASIN, CALIFORNIA: PALEOECOLOGICAL IMPLICATIONS RELATIVE TO BIOMERES: JAMET, Catherine M. and CORSETTI, Frank A., Department of Earth Sciences, Univ. of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90089-0740, jamet@usc.edu
22-32A PALEOECOLOGICAL STUDY OF EARLY CAMBRIAN STROMATOLITIC, THROMBOLITIC, AND ARCHAEOCYATHAN REEFS ON THE YANGTZE PLATFORM, SOUTHERN SHAANXI PROVINCE, CHINA: CYCLES, TRENDS, AND ASSOCIATIONS: HICKS, Melissa and ROWLAND, Stephen, Department of Geoscience, Univ of Nevada, Las Vegas, 4505 Maryland Parkway, Box 454010, Las Vegas, NV 89154-4010, hicksm@unlv.nevada.edu
22-43INVESTIGATIONS BY CONFOCAL SCANNING LASER MICROSCOPY ON MODERN MICROBIAL MATS, AND COMPARISON WITH 2.9 GA OLD BACTERIAL TEXTURES FROM THE PONGOLA SUPERGROUP, SOUTH AFRICA: BOWER, Dina M., Department of Ocean, Earth & Atmospheric Sciences, Old Dominion Univ, 4600 Elkhorn Avenue, Norfolk, VA 23529, dbower@odu.edu and NOFFKE, Nora, Ocean, Earth & Atmospheric Sciences, Old Dominion Univ, 4600, Elkhorn Ave, Norfolk, VA 23529
22-54LITHOFACIES AND TRILOBITE BIOFACIES ON A LATE ORDOVICIAN CARBONATE RAMP: BROMIDE FORMATION, SOUTHERN OKLAHOMA: AMATI, Lisa, Department of Geology, SUNY Potsdam, Potsdam, NY 13676, lamati@potsdam.edu and WESTROP, Stephen R., Oklahoma Museum of Natural History and School of Geology & Geophysics, Univ of Oklahoma, Norman, OK 73072
22-65FINE-SCALE VERSUS COARSE SAMPLING EFFECTS ON DEVONIAN ENCRUSTED BRACHIOPOD ASSEMBLAGES: CEDAR VALLEY FORMATION, IOWA: WEBB, Amelinda and SCHNEIDER, Chris L., Geology, Cornell College, Mt Vernon, IA 52314, a-webb@cornellcollege.edu
22-76AMMONOID ASSEMBLAGES ASSOCIATED WITH RAYONNOCERAS SOLIDIFORME CRONEIS, LOWER FAYETTEVILLE SHALE (CHESTERIAN-MISSISSIPPIAN), NORTHWESTERN ARKANSAS: MORGAN, Kevin M., HORNE, John D., and MANGER, Walter L., Department of Geosciences, Univ of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR 72701, kmmorga@uark.edu
22-87BIOFACIES DISTRIBUTION ALONG AN ENVIRONMENTAL GRADIENT IN THE AMES MEMBER (UPPER PENNSYLVANIAN, GLENSHAW FORMATION): NORTHERN APPALACHIAN BASIN: LEBOLD, Joseph G., Geology and Geography, West Virginia Univ, Morgantown, WV 26506-6300, jlebold@geo.wvu.edu and KAMMER, Thomas W., Geology and Geography, West Virginia Univ, Morgantown, WV 26506-6300
22-98THE COMPLEXITY OF SPECIES ASSOCIATIONS IN PERMIAN BRACHIOPOD COMMUNITIES FROM WEST TEXAS: OLSZEWSKI, Thomas D., Geology and Geophysics, Texas A&M Univ, 3115 TAMU, College Station, TX 77843, tomo@geo.tamu.edu and ERWIN, Douglas H., Department of Paleobiology, MRC-121, National Museum of Nat History, Washington, DC 20560
22-109QUANTIFYING TAPHONOMIC BIAS IN MOLLUSCAN DEATH ASSEMBLAGES FROM THE CHESAPEAKE BAY: PATTERNS OF LIVE-DEAD FIDELITY AND SHELL DAMAGE: LOCKWOOD, Rowan, CHASTANT, Lisa R., and WORK, Lauren A., Department of Geology, The College of William and Mary, PO Box 8795, Williamsburg, VA 23187, rxlock@wm.edu
22-1110LARGE BENTHIC FORAMINIFERA IN SEA-GRASS HABITATS: STANDING CROP VERSUS SEDIMENT ASSEMBLAGES AT SAN SALVADOR, BAHAMAS: BUCHAN, Olivia Claire, Geology and Geography, Auburn Univ, 210 Petrie Hall, Auburn, AL 36849, buchaoc@auburn.edu and LEWIS, Ronald D., Geology and Geography, Auburn Univ, Auburn, AL 36849-5305
22-1211LARGE BENTHIC FORAMINIFERA OF THE FORE-REEF ZONE, SAN SALVADOR, BAHAMAS: PETRUNY, Loren M., Geology and Geography, Auburn Univ, Auburn, AL 36849-5305, petrulo@auburn.edu and LEWIS, Ronald D., Geology and Geography, Auburn Univ, 210 Petrie Hall, Auburn, AL 36849-5305
22-1312BENTHIC FORAMINIFERAL CHARACTERISTICS OF A DIFFUSE PLIOCENE MID-SHELF HYDROCARBON SEEP, CASCADIA CONVERGENT MARGIN: MARTIN, Ruth A. and NESBITT, Elizabeth A., Earth and Space Sciences Department, Univ of Washington, Box 351350, Seattle, WA 98195-1350, ruthm2@u.washington.edu
22-1413PALEOENVIRONMENTAL RECONSTRUCTION OF PYRITIC SHALE FORMATION: ZAMBITO, James J. IV, Geology, Univ at Buffalo, 876 Natural Sciences Complex, Buffalo, NY 14260, jzambo81@hotmail.com.
22-1514ZOOPHYCOS SIZE AS A KEY TO PALEOENVIRONMENT IN THE LOWER DEVONIAN CARLISLE CENTER FORMATION OF NEW YORK STATE: SENGLAUB, Michael, Department of Geology, Bowling Green State Univ, 190 Overman Hall, Bowling Green State University, Bowling Green, OH 43403, senglmd@bgnet.bgsu.edu and YACOBUCCI, Margaret M., Department of Geology, Bowling Green State Univ, 190 Overman Hall, Bowling Green, OH 43403
22-1615A DINOSAUR-RICH SPLAY FILL, SAN RAFAEL SWELL, UTAH: JEFFERY, David L., BISHOP, John R., VONER, Frederick R., and FREEMAN, V. Rocky, Department of Petroleum Engineering and Geology, Marietta College, 215 Fifth Street, Marietta, OH 45750, jefferyd@marietta.edu
22-1716ANASTOMOSING FLUVIAL SYSTEM OF THE CEDAR MOUNTAIN FORMATION, EASTERN UTAH: A PALEOENVIRONMENTAL AND TAPHONOMIC ANALYSIS: MASTERS, Simon L., Geology & Geophysics, Univ of Wisconsin-Madison, 1215 W. Dayton St, Madison, WI 53706, slmasters@wisc.edu, MAXSON, Julie A., Department of Geology, Gustavus Adolphus College, St. Peter, MN 56082, and MADSEN, Scott K., National Park Service, Dinosaur National Monument, Jensen, UT 84035
22-1817STRATIGRAPHY & SEDIMENTOLOGY IN THE UPPER HELL CREEK FORMATION: GARRETSON, Clay C., Geology, PaleoWorld Rsch Foundation, 1214 Mays Branch Road, Van Buren, AR 72956, amaturepaleo@msn.com and HATCHER, Joseph, Paleontology, PaleoWorld Rsch Foundation, 7442 Claypool Street, Englewood, FL 34224
22-1918PALEOECOLOGY AND PALEOENVIRONMENTS OF THE UPPER CRETACEOUS (CENOMANIAN) WOODBINE FORMATION AT LAKE GRAPEVINE; DENTON COUNTY, TEXAS: MAIN, Derek J., Geology Dept, The Univ of Texas at Arlington, Arlington, TX 76019-0049, maindinos@msn.com.
22-2019PALEOECOLOGY OF THE NEOGENE IMPERIAL GROUP OF THE FISH CREEK VALLECITO BASIN; IMPLICATIONS FOR THE ORIGIN OF COARSENING UPWARD SUCCESSIONS IN THE DEGUYNOS AND CAMELS HEAD FORMATIONS: FALERO, Roberto L., Department of Earth Sciences, Univ. of California Riverside, 1463 Geology Bldg, Riverside, CA 92521, falerr01@student.ucr.edu and DROSER, Mary L., Dept. of Earth Sciences, Univ of California, Riverside, 1432 Geology Bldg, Riverside, CA 92521
22-2120TRACE FOSSILS IN THIN-BEDDED VOLCANICLASTIC SILTSTONES AND SANDSTONES OF THE OLIGOCENE TO MIOCENE ROXY FORMATION, JACKSON COUNTY, OREGON: EBNOTHER, Danielle D., Department of Geology & Geophysics, Texas A&M, College Station, TX 77843, DanielleDE@aol.com and ELLIOTT, William S. Jr, Geology, Southern Oregon Univ, 1250 Siskiyou Blvd, Ashland, OR 97520
22-2221DIOPATRICHNUS IN AN EOCENE SHALLOW MARINE CONDENSED SECTION, LISBON FORMATION, ALABAMA: URASH, Rick, Department of Geology and Geography, Auburn Univ, 210 Petrie Hall, Auburn University, Auburn, AL 36849-5305, urashrg@auburn.edu and SAVRDA, Charles, Department of Geology and Geography, Auburn Univ, 210 Petrie Hall, Auburn University, Auburn, AL 36830
22-2322A MIDDLE DEVONIAN EPIZOAN CHONETOID BRACHIOPOD: EXAMPLE OF ATYPICAL LIFE HABIT: PECAR, Janez, 209 West Market St, PO Box 145, Cadiz, OH 43907, janez@eohio.net.
22-2423LIFE HISTORY OF THE MISSISSIPPIAN CRINOID, BARYCRINUS, FROM HOLDFAST DEVELOPMENT: BREMAR, Kathy A., Geological Sciences, The Ohio State Univ, Columbus, OH 43210, Bremar.1@osu.edu and AUSICH, William I., Department of Geological Sciences, The Ohio State Univ, 275 Mendenhall Lab, 125 S. Oval Mall, Columbus, OH 43210
22-2524FUNCTIONAL INTERPRETATION USING PA-ELEMENT MORPHOLOGY AND MICROWEAR PATTERNS IN DESMOINESIAN (PENNSYLVANIAN) IDIOGNATHODID CONODONTS: ROSSCOE, Steven J., Department of Geosciences, Texas Tech Univ, MS1053, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, TX 79409, stevenjrosscoe@yahoo.com.
22-2625COPROLITES AND ENTEROSPIRAE FROM THE MISSISSIPPIAN MICHIGAN FORMATION, WESTERN MICHIGAN: VAN REGENMORTER, John M.1, VIDETICH, Patricia E.1, and NEAL, William J.2, (1) Geology Department, Grand Valley State University, 1 Campus Drive, Allendale, MI 49401, vanregej@student.gvsu.edu, (2) Geology Department, Grand Valley State Univ, 1 Campus Drive, Allendale, MI 49401
22-2726THE LATE TRIASSIC ARCHOSAUROMORPH TRILOPHOSAURUS AS AN ARBOREAL CLIMBER: SPIELMANN, Justin A.1, HECKERT, Andrew B.2, LUCAS, Spencer G.2, RINEHART, Larry F.2, and HUNT, Adrian P.2, (1) Biology, Dartmouth College, Hinman Box 4571, Hanover, NH 03755, Justin.A.Spielmann@dartmouth.edu, (2) New Mexico Museum of Nat History & Sci, 1801 Mountain Road NW, Albuquerque, NM 87104-1375
22-2827A PROPOSED METHOD FOR RECOGNIZING SELECTED PALEOGASTROLITHS USING A SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPE: SCHMEISSER, Rebecca and FLOOD, Tim, Geology Department, St. Norbert College, 100 Grant St, DePere, WI 54115, becky.schmeisser@snc.edu
22-2928PALEOPATHOLOGY IN ARCHOSAURS FROM THE UPPER CRETACEOUS MAEVARANO FORMATION OF MADAGASCAR: FARKE, Andrew A., Department of Anatomical Sciences, Stony Brook Univ, T8 040 Health Sciences Center, Stony Brook, NY 11794-8081, afarke@ic.sunysb.edu.
22-3029FOSSIL PEARLS FROM THE UPPER CRETACEOUS OF TEXAS: FRIEDMAN, Virginia, Geosciences Department, University of Texas at Dallas, 1535 Montebello Drive, Suisun City, CA 94585, friedmanhvj@aol.com and HUNT, Adrian P., New Mexico Museum of Nat History & Sci, 1801 Mountain Road NW, Albuquerque, NM 87104-1375
22-31Paper Withdrawn
22-3230COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF DRILLING PREDATION ON MODERN BRACHIOPODS AND BIVALVE MOLLUSKS FROM A SUBTROPICAL BAY ON A SOUTHERN BRAZILIAN SHELF: SIMOES, Marcello G., Department of Zoology, Institute of Biosciences, Sao Paulo State Univ, UNESP, District of Rubiao Junior, Botucatu, 18618000, btsimoes@ibb.unesp.br, RODRIGUES, Sabrina Coelho, Department of Environmental and Sedimentary Geology, Univ of Sao Paulo, USP, Graduate Program in Sedimentary Geology, Sao Paulo, and KOWALEWSKI, Michal, Department of Geosciences, Virginia Tech, 4044 Derring Hall, Blacksburg, VA 24061
22-3331DOES BODY SIZE INFLUENCE THE OUTCOME OF THE INTERACTION BETWEEN PREDATORY WHELKS AND THEIR BIVALVE PREY?: CAVALLERANO, Edward J., Department of Earth Sciences, Univ of North Carolina at Wilmington, Wilmington, NC 28403, ejc8292@uncw.edu and DIETL, Gregory P., Department of Geology and Geophysics, Yale Univ, New Haven, CT 06520
22-3432REVISITING THE VANTAGE WOODS, COLUMBIA BASALTS, WASHINGTON: WHEELER, Elisabeth A.1, BARTLETT, J.A.2, and DECHERD, Sara2, (1) Wood and Paper Science, N.C. State Univ, Box 8005, Raleigh, NC 27695, elisabeth_wheeler@ncsu.edu, (2) Department of Marine, Earth, and Atmospheric Sciences, N.C. State Univ, Raleigh, NC 27695
22-3533THE OCCURRENCE AND DIVERSITY OF TRACE FOSSILS IN PALEOSOLS OF THE WILLWOOD FORMATION DURING THE PALEOCENE-EOCENE THERMAL MAXIMUM (PETM), BIGHORN BASIN, WYOMING: SMITH, Jon J.1, HASIOTIS, Stephen T.1, KRAUS, Mary J.2, and WOODY, Daniel2, (1) Department of Geology, The Univ of Kansas, 1475 Jayhawk Blvd, 120 Lindley Hall, Lawrence, KS 66045-7613, jjsmith@ku.edu, (2) Dept of Geological Sciences, Univ of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309-0399
22-3634USING PALEOSOLS AND ICHNOFOSSILS TO INTERPRET THE CHANGING PALEOECOLOGY, PALEOENVIRONMENTS, AND PALEOCLIMATE OF THE EOCENE-OLIGOCENE WHITE RIVER FORMATION, NORTHEASTERN COLORADO: HEMBREE, Daniel I., Department of Geology, Univ of Kansas, Lindley Hall, 1475 Jayhawk Blvd., Room 120, Lawrence, KS 66045, danhem@ku.edu and HASIOTIS, Stephen T., Department of Geology, The Univ of Kansas, 1475 Jayhawk Blvd, 120 Lindley Hall, Lawrence, KS 66045-7613
22-37Paper Withdrawn
22-3835DIGITAL LEAF PHYSIOGNOMY: AN AUTOMATED ROUTINE FOR ANALYZING THE SIZE AND SHAPE OF PLANT LEAVES FOR PALEOCLIMATE AND PALEOECOLOGICAL ANALYSIS: JANESKO, David1, ROYER, Dana L.1, WILF, Peter1, KOWALSKI, Elizabeth A.2, and DILCHER, David L.2, (1) Dept. of Geosciences, Pennsylvania State Univ, University Park, PA 16802, daj155@psu.edu, (2) Dept. of Natural Sciences, Univ of Florida, Florida Museum of Natural History, Gainesville, FL 32611
22-39Paper Withdrawn
22-4036PHOTOSYNTHETIC AND STOMATAL RESPONSES OF GINKGO BILOBA TO HIGHLY ENRICHED ATMOSPHERIC CARBON DIOXIDE AND OXYGEN: DECHERD, Sara M.1, PIANTADOSI, Claude A.2, GOLDFARB, Barry3, WHEELER, Elisabeth4, BARRICK, Reese5, SCHWEITZER, Mary H.1, and RUSSELL, Dale A.6, (1) Department of Marine, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, North Carolina State Univ, Box 8208, Raleigh, NC 27695, smdecher@unity.ncsu.edu, (2) Center for Hyperbaric Medicine and Environmental Physiology, Duke Univ, Box 3315 Duke South Hospital, Trent Drive, Durham, NC 27710, (3) Department of Forestry, North Carolina State Univ, Box 8002, Raleigh, NC 27695-8002, (4) Wood & Paper Science, N.C. State Univ, Box 8005, Raleigh, NC 27695-8005, (5) College of Eastern Utah Prehistoric Museum, Price, UT 84501, (6) North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences, Raleigh, NC 27695
22-4137TAPHONOMY OF JUPITER´S ICY MOON EUROPA: LIPPS, Jere H.1, RIEBOLDT, Sarah1, DELORY, Gregory2, and PITMAN, Joe3, (1) Department of Integrative Biology & Museum of Paleontology, Univ of California, Berkeley, CA 94720, jlipps@uclink4.berkeley.edu, (2) Center for Integrative Planetary Sciences, Univeristy of California, Berkeley, CA 94720, (3) Advanced Technology Center, Lockheed Martin, Palo Alto, CA 94304
22-4238THREE DIMENSIONAL ORIENTATIONS OF CRINOID PLURICOLUMNALS VERIFY DEPOSITIONAL PROCESSES: JOHNSON, Katherine, JUDGE, Shelley A., and AUSICH, William I., Department of Geological Sciences, The Ohio State Univ, 275 Mendenhall Lab, 125 S. Oval Mall, Columbus, OH 43210, johnson.2362@osu.edu
22-4339DEPOSITIONAL SETTING AND TAPHONOMY OF FISH-PART CONGLOMERATES, TRIASSIC LOCKATONG FORMATION, COLLEGEVILLE, PA: SIMPSON, W.S.1, RHOADS, C.L.2, SIMPSON, E.L.3, SZAJNA, M.J.4, and HARTLINE, B.W.4, (1) Parkland High School, Allentown, PA 18104, wsimpson@ix.netcom.com, (2) Physical Sciences, Kutztown Univ, Kutztown, PA 19530, (3) Physcial Science, Kutztown Univ, Kutztown, PA 19530, (4) Reading Public Museum, 500 Museum Road, Reading, PA 19611
22-4440TAPHONOMIC IMPLICATIONS OF THE MICROSTRATIGRAPHY AND FAUNA OF A SINGLE BLOCK FROM THE LATE TRIASSIC WHITAKER (COELOPHYSIS) QUARRY (ROCK POINT FORMATION: CHINLE GROUP), NORTH-CENTRAL NEW MEXICO: RINEHART, Larry F.1, HECKERT, Andrew B.2, LUCAS, Spencer G.2, and HUNT, Adrian P.3, (1) New Mexico Museum of Nat hisory, 1801 Mountain Road NW, Albuquerque, NM 87104, rinehartl@nmmnh.state.nm.us, (2) New Mexico Museum of Nat History, 1801 Mountain Rd NW, Albuquerque, NM 87104, (3) New Mexico Museum of Nat History & Sci, 1801 Mountain Road NW, Albuquerque, NM 87104-1375
22-4541TAPHONOMIC PALEOFLORISTICS STUDIES OF THE UPPER TRIASSIC ISCHIGUALASTO FORMATION, NW ARGENTINA: COLOMBI, Carina, CONICET- Instituto y Museo de Ciencias Naturales, Universidad Nacional de San Juan, España 400 (N) Ciudad, San Juan, Argentina, ccolombi@unsj.edu.ar and PARRISH, Judith Totman, Dept. of Geological Sciences, Univ of Idaho, P.O. Box 443022, Moscow, ID 83844
22-4642A COMPARATIVE INVESTIGATION OF DIAGENESIS IN FOSSIL TEETH: A CASE STUDY FROM THE UPPER CRETACEOUS TWO MEDICINE AND JUDITH RIVER FORMATIONS OF MONTANA: DWYER, Christopher N.1, ROGERS, Raymond R.1, FRICKE, Henry2, and THOLE, Jeffrey T.1, (1) Geology Department, Macalester College, 1600 Grand Avenue, Saint Paul, MN 55105, cdwyer@macalester.edu, (2) Department of Geology, Colorado College, Colorado Springs, CO 80903
22-4743ASSESSING THE IMPACT OF DIAGENESIS ON CARBON ISOTOPE RATIOS OF DINOSAUR TOOTH ENAMEL: A CASE STUDY FROM THE HELL CREEK FORMATION IN NORTH DAKOTA: ECHT, Susan and FRICKE, Henry, Department of Geology, Colorado College, Colorado Springs, CO 80903, s_echt@coloradocollege.edu
22-4844ELEMENTAL AND MINERALOGICAL CHARACTERIZATION OF CENOZOIC SHARK SKELETAL MATERIAL: IMPLICATION FOR QUANTIFYING DIAGENESIS: LABS HOCHSTEIN, Joann, Department of Geological Sciences and Florida Museum of Natural History, Univ of Florida, 241 Williamson Hall, Gainesville, FL 32611, jlabs@ufl.edu.
22-4945CADDISFLY (INSECTA: TRICHOPTERA) PUPAL CASES USED AS UNIQUE AUTOCHTHONOUS PALEOENVIRONMENTAL INDICATORS: EOCENE LAKE GOSIUTE: LEGGITT, V. Leroy, Department of Natural Sciences, Loma Linda Univ, Loma Linda, CA 92350, lleggitt@sd.llu.edu, CUSHMAN, Robert A. Jr, Laboratory of Paleopalynology, Loma Linda Univ, Loma Linda, CA 92350, and LOEWEN, Mark A., Department of Geology and Geophysics, Univ of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112-0050
22-5046DIATREMES ARE A GULL'S BEST FRIEND: GEOLOGY AND AVIAN TAPHONOMY OF FOSSIL LAKE, OREGON: MCCARVILLE, Katherine, Department of Geology and Geological Engineering, South Dakota School of Mines and Technology, 501 E. St. Joseph Street, Rapid City, SD 57701, kmccarvi@sdsmt.edu.
22-5147A TAPHONOMIC STUDY OF CLARENDONIAN (MIOCENE) TELEOCERAS (PERISSODACTYLA, RHINOCEROTOIDEA) FROM THE OGALLALA FORMATION NORTHWESTERN KANSAS: BARTLEY, Katherine Jean1, MITCHELL, Charles2, and KORTH, William2, (1) Geology, SUNY at Buffalo, 786 Natural Sciences Complex, Buffalo, NY 14260, orion9@vaxxine.com, (2) Dept. of Geology, SUNY at Buffalo, 876 Natural Sciences Complex, Buffalo, NY 14260
22-5248EXPERIMENTAL TAPHONOMY OF THE BLUE CRAB, CALLINECTES SAPIDUS: ENVIRONMENTAL AND CUTICULAR CONTROLS ON PRESERVATION: MUTEL, Matt M., Oberlin College, 52 West Lorain St, Oberlin, OH 44074, mmutel@oberlin.edu, WAUGH, David, Department of Geology, Kent State Univ, Kent, OH 44242, FELDMANN, Rodney M., Department of Geology, Kent State Univ, Kent, OH 44242, and PARSONS-HUBBARD, Karla, Geology Dept, Oberlin College, Oberlin, OH 44074
22-5349ORGANIC MATRIX IN CIRRIPEDS: SIMILARITIES TO MATRIX IN OTHER GROUPS AND ITS TAPHONOMIC POTENTIAL: CLARK, George R. II, Department of Geology, Kansas State Univ, 108 Thompson Hall, Manhattan, KS 66506, grc@ksu.edu.
22-5450EXPERIMENTALLY DEPLOYED WOOD ON THE SEA FLOOR: IMPLICATIONS FOR UNDERSTANDING THE TEREDOLITES ICHNOFACIES: LICHLYTER, Stephen A., Dept. of Geology and Geophysics, Texas A&M Univ, College Station, TX 77843, slichlyter@geo.tamu.edu, HEISE, Elizabeth A., Department of Chemistry and Environmental Sciences, Univ of Texas at Brownsville, 80 Fort Brown, Brownsville, TX 78520, and RAYMOND, Anne, Dept. of Gelogy & Geophysics, Texas A&M Univ, College Station, TX 77843-3115
22-5551MOLLUSCS AND CRABS IN A PICKLE: A BRINE SEEP KONSERVAT-LAGERSTÄTTE: PARSONS-HUBBARD, Karla1, POWELL, Eric2, WALKER, Sally E.3, CALLENDER, Russell4, STAFF, George5, ASHTON-ALCOX, Kathryn2, and SHEPARD, Rebekah6, (1) Geology Dept, Oberlin College, Oberlin, OH 44074, Karla.Hubbard@Oberlin.edu, (2) Haskin Shellfish Research Lab, Rutgers Univ, Port Norris, NJ 08349, (3) Department of Geology, Univ of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602, (4) National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Oceanic and Atmospheric Research, 1315 East West Highway, Silver Spring, MD 20910, (5) Geology Department, Austin Community College, NRG Campus, 11928 Stone Hollow Drive, Austin, TX 78758, (6) Department of Geology, Univ of California, Davis, Davis, CA 95616
22-5652EARLIEST EVIDENCE OF INVERTEBRATE SEXUAL BEHAVIOR, OR A TIDAL FLAT TRAFFIC JAM IN THE POTSDAM FM. (LATE CAMBRIAN)?: ERICKSON, J. Mark, Geology Department, St. Lawrence Univ, Canton, NY 13617, meri@stlawu.edu.
22-5753THE GIANT ARTHROPLEURA TRACKWAY DIPLICHNITES CUITHENSIS FROM THE CUTLER GROUP (UPPER PENNSYLVANIAN) OF NEW MEXICO: HUNT, Adrian P.1, LUCAS, Spencer G.1, LERNER, Allan1, and HANNIBAL, Joseph T.2, (1) New Mexico Museum of Nat History, 1801 Mountain Road NW, Albuquerque, NM 87104, hanallaine@aol.com, (2) Cleveland Museum of Nat History, 1 Wade Oval Drive, Cleveland, OH 44106-1767
22-5854THE OLDEST TETRAPOD FOOTPRINT ICHNOFAUNA, FROM THE LOWER MISSISSIPPIAN HORTON BLUFF FORMATION, NOVA SCOTIA, CANADA: LUCAS, Spencer G.1, HUNT, Adrian P.1, MANSKY, Chris2, and CALDER, John H.3, (1) New Mexico Museum of Nat History & Sci, 1801 Mountain Road NW, Albuquerque, NM 87104-1375, slucas@nmmnh.state.nm.us, (2) Blue Beach Fossil Museum, 127 Blue Beach Rd, Hantsport, Nova Scotia, Canada, (3) Nova Scotia Department of Nat Rscs, P. O. Box 698, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada
22-5955TETRAPOD FOOTPRINTS FROM NOVA SCOTIA: THE ROSETTA STONE FOR CARBONIFEROUS TETRAPOD ICHNOLOGY: HUNT, Adrian P., New Mexico Museum of Nat History, 1801 Mountain Road NW, Albuquerque, NM 87104, AHunt@nmmnh.state.nm.us, LUCAS, Spencer G., Paleontology, New Mexico Museum of Nat History & Sci, 1801 Mountain Road NW, Albuquerque, NM 87104, CALDER, John H., Nova Scotia Dept. of Nat Rscs, PO Box 698, Halifax, NS B3J 2T9, Canada, jhcalder@gov.ns.ca, VAN ALLEN, Howard E.K., 13 Dahlia St, Dartmouth, NS B3A 2R8, Canada, GEORGE, Eldon, Parrsboro Rock and Mineral Shop, Parrsboro, NS B0M 1S0, GIBLING, Martin R., Department of Earth Sciences, Dalhousie Univ, Halifax, NS B3H 3J5, Canada, HEBERT, Brian L., Lower Cove, NS B0L 1A0, MANSKY, Chris, Blue Beach Fossil Museum, 127 Blue Beach Rd, Hantsport, Nova Scotia, Canada, and REID, Donald R., Joggins Fossil Centre, Joggins, NS B0L 1A0
22-6056A NEW THEROPOD TRACKWAY WITH AN ASSOCIATED TAIL TRACE FROM THE UPPER JURASSIC MORRISON FORMATION, BIGHORN BASIN, WYOMING, USA: PLATT, Brian F., Geology, Univ of Kansas, 1475 Jayhawk Blvd, 120 Lindley Hall, Lawrence, KS 66045-7613, bplatt@ku.edu, HASIOTIS, Stephen T., Dept of Geology, Univ of Kansas, Lawrence, KS 66045-7613, and KVALE, Erik P., Indiana Geological Survey, Indiana Univ, 611 N. Walnut Grove, Bloomington, IN 47405
22-6157ALCOVA'S PTERAICHNUS LAGERSTÄTTEN: CONNELY, Melissa V., Geology, Casper College, 125 College Dr, Casper, WY 82601, mconnely@caspercollege.edu.
22-6258A NEW ICHNOSPECIES OF AQUATILAVIPES FROM THE ALBIAN-CENOMANIAN DAKOTA FORMATION OF NORTHEASTERN UTAH: ANFINSON, Owen A, GEOLOGY, Gustavus Adolphus College, 800 W. College Ave, St. Peter, MN 56082, OANFINSO@GAC.EDU, GULBRANSON, Erik, Geological Sciences, Univ of Minnesota, Duluth, 1114 Kirby Drive, Duluth, MN 55812, and MAXSON, Julie A., Department of Geology, Gustavus Adolphus College, St. Peter, MN 56082
22-6359THERAPSID BURROWS IN THE LOWER JURASSIC NAVAJO SANDSTONE, SOUTHEASTERN UTAH: ODIER, Georges P., 115 W. Kane Creek Blvd. # 29, Moab, UT 84532, gpodier@preciscom.net, LUCAS, Spencer G., New Mexico Museum of Nat History & Sci, 1801 Mountain Road NW, Albuquerque, NM 87104-1375, MCCORMICK, Tamsin, Plateau Restoration, P. O. Box 1363, Moab, UT 84532, and EGAN, Colin, 115 W. Kane Creek Blvd. #28, Moab, UT 84532

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