2006 Philadelphia Annual Meeting (2225 October 2006)
Paper No. 23-17
Presentation Time: 8:00 AM-12:00 PM

MAZON CREEK (DESMONESIAN, PENNSYLVANIAN) PTERIDOSPERM - ARTHROPOD INTERACTION: NON-MARGINAL LEAF FEEDING

PECAR, Janez, 209 West Market St, PO Box 145, Cadiz, OH 43907, janez@eohio.net

In the past there have been numerous reports concerning the interactions of vascular plants and arthropods in the Upper Carboniferous and Pennsylvanian, including Mazon Creek fossils.In this present report a study was done on the leafs of the large leaf pteridosperm Neuropteris sensu lato for evaluation of the above described interaction. 127 such specimens of Neuropteris sensu lato from the Mazon Creek, Illinois area (Desmonesian, Pennsylvanian)were studied. These are from the authors personal collection. All are second hand specimens and there is obvious bias towards well preserved specimens. 2 specimens out of the 127 show possible signs of leaf feeding, possibly by arthropods. One specimen shows almost continuous marginal leaf feeding on two thirds of one side of leaf, feeding line has the form of gentle wavy curve. Another leaf has one deep marginal indentation (marginal leaf feeding) which has a border in the form of a groove. On the same leaf there are also eight slightly oval nonmarginal defects with a larger diameter of 1.5-3.7 mm, these have slightly irregular grooved borders.Tentatively this finding is the first report of nonmarginal arthropod leaf feeding in Pennsylvanian and Upper Carboniferous. Such feeding has been described from Cretaceous till Recent and its finding in Pennsylvanian is treated by present author with caution.

2006 Philadelphia Annual Meeting (2225 October 2006)
General Information for this Meeting
Session No. 23--Booth# 40
Paleontology/Paleobotany (Posters) I: Paleoecology, Taphonomy, and Early Life
Pennsylvania Convention Center: Exhibit Hall C
8:00 AM-12:00 PM, Sunday, 22 October 2006

Geological Society of America Abstracts with Programs, Vol. 38, No. 7, p. 66

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