2008 Joint Meeting of The Geological Society of America, Soil Science Society of America, American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, Gulf Coast Association of Geological Societies with the Gulf Coast Section of SEPM
Paper No. 227-8
Presentation Time: 10:10 AM-10:25 AM

Preliminary Assessment of Transport Trends in a Transgressive Barrier Island Chain Using Multidimensional Numerical Models

GEORGIOU, Ioannis, Earth and Environmental Sciences and Pontchartrain Institute for Environmental Sciences, University of New Orleans, 2000 Lakeshore Dr, New Orleans, LA 70148, igeorgio@uno.edu, KULP, Mark A., Dept. of Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of New Orleans, 2000 Lakeshore Drive, New Orleans, LA 70148, MINER, Michael D., Pontchartrain Institute for Environmental Sciences, University of New Orleans, 2000 Lakeshore Dr, New Orleans, LA 70148, FLOCKS, James G., Florida Integrated Science Center-St. Petersburg, U.S. Geological Survey, 600 Fourth Street South, Saint Petersburg, FL 33701, and TWICHELL, David C., U.S. Geological Survey, Woods Hole, MA 02543

Increased tropical cyclone frequency in the past decade has resulted in an increased rate of landward migration, transgressive submergence, and dynamic changes in barrier island areal extent. Field observations in the summer of 2007 and 2008, and historical data including satellite and aerial reconnaissance flights in the vicinity and offshore of the barrier chain were used to assess the destructive and constructive processes during intermediate and high energy events, as well as low energy conditions during the recovery period. A multidimensional numerical modeling approach is undertaken here to quantitatively and qualitatively estimate transport trends across the islands, and better determine the future recovery modes of the islands. Long-term wind and wave climate using 25 years of observations from nearby (offshore) buoys were used to assess the dominant transport pathways for different periods during the year. Two and three-dimensional hydrodynamic, wave and sediment transport models were also used to investigate changes in the dominant transport trends during high and low energy conditions, and how this might affect the islands ability to maintain its aerial footprint during high storm activity.

2008 Joint Meeting of The Geological Society of America, Soil Science Society of America, American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, Gulf Coast Association of Geological Societies with the Gulf Coast Section of SEPM
General Information for this Meeting
Session No. 227
The Mississippi River Delta as a Natural Laboratory for Evaluating Coastal Response to Relative Sea-Level Rise and Innovations in Transgressive Coastal Management: Shea Penland Memorial Session
George R. Brown Convention Center: General Assembly Theater Hall A
8:00 AM-12:00 PM, Tuesday, 7 October 2008

Geological Society of America Abstracts with Programs, Vol. 40, No. 6, p. 314

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