2009 Portland GSA Annual Meeting (18-21 October 2009)
Paper No. 177-10
Presentation Time: 9:00 AM-6:00 PM

EVALUATION OF MODELS FOR HEAT TRACING IN STREAMBEDS (HYPORHEIC ZONES) ALONG A POOL-RIFFLE-POOL SEQUENCE: JARAMILLO CREEK, VALLES CALDERA NATIONAL PRESERVE, NM

SWANSON, Travis, Department of Geological Sciences, Jackson School of Geosciences, The University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station C1100, Austin, TX 78712, tswanson@mail.utexas.edu, CARDENAS, M. Bayani, Department of Geological Sciences, Jackson School of Geosciences, The University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station C9000, Austin, TX 78712-0254, SAWYER, Audrey H., Department of Geological Sciences, University of Delaware, 101A Penny Hall, Newark, DE 19716, and NOWINSKI, John, Department of Geological Sciences, Jackson School of Geosciences, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712

A pool-riffle-pool sequence in streambed morphology is thought to drive hyporheic downwelling near the head of the riffle and upwelling at the tail of the riffle and head of the lower pool. Heat tracing is a potentially useful method to characterize these hyporheic flow paths. A pool-riffle-pool sequence within Jaramillo Creek, Valles Caldera National Preserve, New Mexico was instrumented with a two dimensional vertical array of thermistors during the summers of 2008 and 2009. Three one-dimensional analytical heat transport models (Hatch et al, Keery et al, and Schmidt et al) were used to individually interpret sections of the pool-riffle-pool sequence to quantify vertical fluid fluxes. The modeled fluxes were then compared to values obtained from vertical hydraulic gradient and hydraulic conductivity measurements. The fluxes estimated by the heat tracing methods exhibit a trend that partly follows the conceptual model of a pool-riffle-pool sequence. The directly calculated fluxes mostly agree with heat tracing based estimates. The deviation in flux distribution from the conceptual “downwelling-upwelling” model is partly due to the dominantly loosing conditions at the study site. Moreover, varying assumptions concerning boundary conditions and physical properties of the streambed that are intrinsic to the analytical models produce somewhat inconsistent results between methods. Careful selection of a model for heat tracing is vital to obtaining accurate fluid flux estimates.

2009 Portland GSA Annual Meeting (18-21 October 2009)
General Information for this Meeting
Session No. 177--Booth# 193
Stream-Groundwater Interaction: New Understanding, Innovations, and Applications at Bedform, Reach, and River Network Scales (Posters)
Oregon Convention Center: Hall A
9:00 AM-6:00 PM, Tuesday, 20 October 2009

Geological Society of America Abstracts with Programs, Vol. 41, No. 7, p. 469

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