Rocky Mountain Section - 61st Annual Meeting (11-13 May 2009)
Paper No. 11-30
Presentation Time: 8:00 AM-5:00 PM

OSL DATING AND GEOARCHAEOLOGY AT THE PALEOINDIAN HEATH SITE, SAN JUAN MOUNTAINS, COLORADO

JACKSON, Melissa S.1, PEDERSON, Joel L.2, RITTENOUR, Tammy M.2, and PITBLADO, Bonnie L.3, (1) Logan, UT 84321, m.jackson@aggiemail.usu.edu, (2) Geology, Utah State University, 4505 Old Main Hill, Logan, UT 84322, (3) Sociology, Social Work and Anthropology, Utah State University, Logan, UT 84322

Geomorphic studies supporting investigations at the Heath Site in the San Juan Mountains of Colorado have established age control through optically-stimulated luminescence dating and interpreted landscape history through sediment and soil stratigraphic analysis. The cultural site is multi-component, with rare Paleoindian remains, making the site important for the archaeological record. The sediments preserving the site are slopewash hillslope deposits with some eolian input. These sediments accompanied with an underlying debris flow form a depositional wedge atop glacial-outwash fluvial gravels of a strath terrace 26 m above and overlooking the deeply incised Lake Fork of the Gunnison River. Results suggest that the landscape was stable and slowly accreting throughout its cultural history meaning the physical environment for the repeated occupations was not significantly changing. Furthermore, during these occupations, the site location was not part of the floodplain for Lake Fork of the Gunnison River, but situated on a terrace several meters above the incising river.

Rocky Mountain Section - 61st Annual Meeting (11-13 May 2009)
General Information for this Meeting
Session No. 11--Booth# 32
General Discipline Posters
Utah Valley University: Library 4th Floor
8:00 AM-5:00 PM, Tuesday, 12 May 2009

Geological Society of America Abstracts with Programs, Vol. 41, No. 6, p. 39

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