2010 GSA Denver Annual Meeting (31 October 3 November 2010)
Paper No. 110-41
Presentation Time: 8:00 AM-6:00 PM

INVESTIGATING THE HYDROLOGIC CONNECTION IN A COMPLEX RIVER FLOODPLAIN SYSTEM IN MIDDLE GA

MANGRUM, Maxwell1, MUTITI, Samuel2, DORAN, Patrick3, OETTER, Doug4, MEAD, Alfred2, SEO, Carol2, MELVIN, Christine2, LINDSEY, Rachel5, and HOBSON, Chad2, (1) Georgia College and State University, 123 Robbie Drive, Byron, GA 31008, maxwell.mangrum@gmail.com, (2) Biology and Enviromental Sciences Department, Georgia College and State University, Campus Box 081, Milledgeville, GA 31061, (3) Biology and Enviromental Sciences Department, Georgia College and State University, 145 South Irwin Street, Apartment 1303, Milledgeville, GA 31061, (4) Department of History, Geography, and Philosophy, Georgia College and State University, 315 Terrell Hall 231 W. Hancock St. GCSU CBX 047, Milledgeville, GA 31061, (5) Department of History, Geography, and Philosophy, Georgia College and State University, 231 W. Hancock St. GCSU CBX 047, Milledgeville, GA 31061

In this study, we examine the surface water flow system of an area in Milledgeville and its hydrologic connection to the Oconee River. The site of the study is an area locally known as the Oconee River Greenway, which is at the confluence of the Oconee River and a major tributary, Fishing Creek. In addition to providing space for recreation, the Greenway also provides an esthetically pleasing environment and benefits of wetland functions for the city. As the greenway expands and becomes more developed an advanced knowledge of surface and subsurface hydrology is required to achieve the management and educational goals brought forth by the greenway authority. The working hypothesis for this study was that a wetland of interest is being fed by ground water instead of overland flow from precipitation or flood events. Surface water flow paths were created using an elevation grid developed from data collected using a total station and topographic maps. Hydrogeologic data were collected using hand augers, piezometers and electrical resistivity. To investigate the connections between the wetland and ground water, infiltration and hydraulic conductivity of the sediments underlying the wetland and the abandoned channel were determined using slug tests, in-situ and laboratory permeameters. All data, including resistivity results, were incorporated in the GIS system to produce 3-D visualizations of both the surface and subsurface systems at the Greenway. Results of this research revealed the presence of an approximately one-foot clay layer, with very low hydraulic conductivity, underlying the wetland. The depth of the water table and the presences of this low conductivity layer convinces us that the water in the wetland is not generated by groundwater discharge. We concluded that groundwater development in this area would not have much impact on the functioning and aesthetic value of the wetland. Periodic flood events are crucial in supplying the wetland with water and therefore, future development should ensure that flood waters continue to reach the wetland.

2010 GSA Denver Annual Meeting (31 October 3 November 2010)
General Information for this Meeting
Session No. 110--Booth# 303
Sigma Gamma Epsilon Undergraduate Research (Posters)
Colorado Convention Center: Hall D
8:00 AM-6:00 PM, Monday, 1 November 2010

Geological Society of America Abstracts with Programs, Vol. 42, No. 5, p. 291

© Copyright 2010 The Geological Society of America (GSA), all rights reserved. Permission is hereby granted to the author(s) of this abstract to reproduce and distribute it freely, for noncommercial purposes. Permission is hereby granted to any individual scientist to download a single copy of this electronic file and reproduce up to 20 paper copies for noncommercial purposes advancing science and education, including classroom use, providing all reproductions include the complete content shown here, including the author information. All other forms of reproduction and/or transmittal are prohibited without written permission from GSA Copyright Permissions.