Northeastern Section (45th Annual) and Southeastern Section (59th Annual) Joint Meeting (13-16 March 2010)
Paper No. 9-11
Presentation Time: 8:00 AM-12:05 PM

TRACE FOSSIL ANALYSIS OF FRASNIAN STRATA EXPOSED AT IRISH GULF, BOSTON, NY

CUEVAS, Regina and BOYER, Diana L., Earth Sciences, SUNY Oswego, 240 Piez Hall, Oswego, NY 13126, cuevas@oswego.edu

The End Devonian (Frasnian/Famennian) mass extinction is one of five major mass extinctions. The specific cause of this extinction is not well constrained, but it is commonly associated with low oxygen conditions. In order to explore the dynamics of bottom water oxygen conditions leading up to the extinction event, trace fossils are used to estimate oxygen levels at Irish Gulf in North Boston, New York where the Hanover Formation (Frasnian) is well exposed. Trace fossils were described in detail through nearly 35 meters of inter-bedded siltstones and shales. Trace fossils at this locality are identified as Plantolites and Paleophycus are common through the succession, but decrease in abundance approaching the Frasnian/Famennian boundary. Ichnofabric index as a way to quantify relative amount of bioturbation and trace fossil width recorded for more than 800 individual burrows are used to infer relative bottom water oxygen levels. Through this section, variations in trace fossil assemblages support that bottom water oxygen levels fluctuate and ultimately decrease to zero below the Frasnian/Famennian boundary.

Northeastern Section (45th Annual) and Southeastern Section (59th Annual) Joint Meeting (13-16 March 2010)
General Information for this Meeting
Session No. 9--Booth# 11
Paleontology I, Paleozoic (Posters)
Sheraton Baltimore City Center: International ABCDF
8:00 AM-12:05 PM, Sunday, 14 March 2010

Geological Society of America Abstracts with Programs, Vol. 42, No. 1, p. 65

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