2011 GSA Annual Meeting in Minneapolis (9–12 October 2011)
Paper No. 20-8
Presentation Time: 9:55 AM-10:10 AM

THE ACTIVE DRUMLIN FIELD AT THE MÚLAJÖKULL SURGE-TYPE GLACIER, ICELAND – GEOMORPHOLOGY AND SEDIMENTOLOGY

SCHOMACKER, Anders1, JOHNSON, Mark D.2, BENEDIKTSSON, Ívar Örn3, INGÓLFSSON, Ólafur3, and JÓNSSON, Sverrir A.3, (1) Department of Geology, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Sem Saelands Veg 1, Bergbygget, Trondheim, N-7491, Norway, anders.schomacker@ntnu.no, (2) Earth Science, University of Gothenburg, Box 460, 405 30 Göteborg, Göteborg, 405 30, Sweden, (3) Institute of Earth Sciences, University of Iceland, Askja, Sturlugata 7, Reykjavík, IS-101, Iceland

Recent marginal retreat of Múlajökull, a surge-type, outlet glacier of the Hofsjökull ice cap, central Iceland, has revealed a drumlin field consisting of over 50 drumlins. The drumlins are 90–320 m long, 30–105 m wide, 5–10 m in relief, and composed of multiple beds of till deposited by lodgement and bed deformation. The youngest till layer truncates the older units with an erosion surface that parallels the drumlin form. Thus, the drumlins are built up and formed by a combination of subglacial depositional and erosional processes. Field evidence suggests each till bed to be associated with individual, recent surges. We consider the drumlin field to be active in the sense that the drumlins are shaped by the current glacial regime. To our knowledge, the Múlajökull field is the only known active drumlin field and is, therefore, a unique analogue to Pleistocene drumlin fields.

2011 GSA Annual Meeting in Minneapolis (9–12 October 2011)
General Information for this Meeting
Session No. 20
Glacial Geology and Cryogenic Processes
Minneapolis Convention Center: Room L100A-C
8:00 AM-12:00 PM, Sunday, 9 October 2011

Geological Society of America Abstracts with Programs, Vol. 43, No. 5, p. 65

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