Paper No. 203-6
Presentation Time: 3:00 PM

SYNCHRONIZED STASIS AND ABRUPT CHANGE IN THE ACCUMULATION RATE HISTORY AND FACIES BETWEEN THE DAN RIVER-DANVILLE (NC & VA) AND OTHER EASTERN NORTH AMERICAN TRIASSIC-JURASSIC BASINS


OLSEN, Paul, Earth and Environmental Sciences, Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory of Columbia University, 61 Route 9W, Palisades, NY 10964-1000, polsen@ldeo.columbia.edu, KENT, Dennis V., Earth and Planetary Sciences, Rutgers University, Wright-Rieman Labs, 610 Taylor Road, Piscataway, NJ 08854, REID, Jeffrey C., North Carolina Division of Land Resources, 1612 Mail Service Center, Raleigh, NC 27699-1612, WHITESIDE, Jessica H., Department of Geological Sciences, Brown University, Providence, RI 02912, LETOURNEAU, Peter, Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, 61 Route 9W, Palisades, NY 10964, and ET-TOUHAMI, Mohammed, Département des Sciences de la Terre, Université Mohammed Premier Oujda, Oujda, 60,000, Morocco
Quantitative correlation of the Dan River-Danville basin with the Newark basin APTS 2010 and Deep River basin based on paleomagnetic polarity stratigraphy and pervasive orbitally-paced lake level cycles shows that the eastern North American and Moroccan basins evolved through time in a remarkably synchronized pattern during the Late Triassic. The accumulation rate histories of the basins are segmented into correlative intervals lasting millions of years with virtually no change in the long-term accumulation rate (at the 400-kyr-scale), with abrupt transitions between segments, despite having overall different accumulation rates. This is startling, given a simple model of basin growth, suggesting some kind of compensation in sediment input for the increasing surface of the area of the basin through time. Large-scale facies packaging also changes synchronously between basins. These correlated changes in the accumulation rate and facies in these basins suggests a very large-scale linkage, at the plate-tectonic scale, perhaps with some kind of balance between extension rates, basin accommodation space and regional drainage basin size.