North-Central Section - 46th Annual Meeting (2324 April 2012)
Paper No. 27-3
Presentation Time: 1:40 PM-2:00 PM

IMPACT OF THE OHIO GEOLOGICAL SURVEY ON THE OHIO ECONOMY

SWINFORD, Edward M., Ohio Division of Geological Survey, Ohio Deparment of Natural Resources, 2045 Morse Road, Building C-1, Columbus, OH 43229-6693, mac.swinford@dnr.state.oh.us and WICKSTROM, Lawrence, Ohio Geological Survey, 2045 Morse Rd, Columbus, OH 43229

State geological surveys contribute considerable benefits to a state’s economy. The Ohio Department of Natural Resources, Division of Geological Survey (Survey) contracted Kleinhenz & Associates, a Cleveland-based economic and business consulting firm, to conduct an economic impact analysis on the products, information, services, and expenditures provided by and associated with the Survey, examining how it benefits industry, government agencies, the academic community, and Ohio citizens. The analysis included a public online survey, as well as roundtable discussions and one-on-one interviews with industry experts and a wide spectrum of constituents. According to the analysis, in 2010 the Survey provided to the state’s economy a minimum benefit equaling $575 million dollars. More than 8,700 projects utilized items provided by the Survey, saving an average of $65,800 per project in costs that otherwise would be needed to cover additional information gathering or research. Online survey respondents appreciated having quality information before beginning projects and reported that information obtained from the Survey ascribed to avoiding costly mistakes on average of $139,442 per project. The analysis further details how Survey products and expertise are utilized by oil-and-gas exploration firms, mining companies, government agencies, university researchers, K–12 educators, and environmental and geotechnical firms. For instance, online survey respondents representing the oil-and-gas industry reported an average of 13.6 percent of project costs would be attributable to obtaining geologic information if it were not available through the Survey, saving the industry $10.5M per year. The first of its kind, this economic impact analysis numerically establishes the vital benefit that a state geological survey has on a state’s economy.

North-Central Section - 46th Annual Meeting (2324 April 2012)
General Information for this Meeting
Session No. 27
Environmental Geoscience II
Dayton Convention Center: Room 304
1:00 PM-2:40 PM, Tuesday, 24 April 2012

Geological Society of America Abstracts with Programs, Vol. 44, No. 5, p. 73

© Copyright 2012 The Geological Society of America (GSA), all rights reserved. Permission is hereby granted to the author(s) of this abstract to reproduce and distribute it freely, for noncommercial purposes. Permission is hereby granted to any individual scientist to download a single copy of this electronic file and reproduce up to 20 paper copies for noncommercial purposes advancing science and education, including classroom use, providing all reproductions include the complete content shown here, including the author information. All other forms of reproduction and/or transmittal are prohibited without written permission from GSA Copyright Permissions.