2014 GSA Annual Meeting in Vancouver, British Columbia (1922 October 2014)
Paper No. 127-7
Presentation Time: 9:00 AM-6:30 PM

USE OF ELECTRON BACKSCATTER DIFFRACTION FOR RAPID IDENTIFICATION OF MINERAL PARTICULATE: EXAMPLES FROM UNPOLISHED SPECIMENS OF ASBESTOS REFERENCE MATERIALS, ZEOLITES, AND AIRBORNE PARTICULATES

BANDLI, Bryan R., Department of Geological Sciences, University of Minnesota, Duluth, MN 55812, bbandli@d.umn.edu and GUNTER, Mickey E., Geological Sciences, University of Idaho, 875 Perimeter MS 443022, Moscow, ID 83844

We will present the results of analysis of a variety of materials including asbestos reference materials, zeolites, and airborne particulate samples and show that electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) is a powerful tool for phase identification of mineral particulate samples. We will also show various sample preparation methods, none of which require the samples to be polished. Natural occurrences of asbestos can pose significant challenges to standardized analytical methods designed for the built environment and we will present a discussion of various methods and challenges associated with routine asbestos analysis. We will show how EBSD (and transmission EBSD, tEBSD) data can be collected from samples prepared both on membrane filter substrates and on carbon support films to exemplify how the technique can be used in conjunction with standardized analytical protocols for asbestos containing materials. Using EBSD to aid in phase identification can minimize the uncertainty associated with identification amphibole, pyroxene, and zeolite minerals that exists in current standardized asbestos analytical methods.

2014 GSA Annual Meeting in Vancouver, British Columbia (1922 October 2014)
General Information for this Meeting
Session No. 127--Booth# 168
Mineralogy/Crystallography (Posters)
Vancouver Convention Centre-West: Exhibition Hall C
9:00 AM-6:30 PM, Monday, 20 October 2014


© Copyright 2014 The Geological Society of America (GSA), all rights reserved. Permission is hereby granted to the author(s) of this abstract to reproduce and distribute it freely, for noncommercial purposes. Permission is hereby granted to any individual scientist to download a single copy of this electronic file and reproduce up to 20 paper copies for noncommercial purposes advancing science and education, including classroom use, providing all reproductions include the complete content shown here, including the author information. All other forms of reproduction and/or transmittal are prohibited without written permission from GSA Copyright Permissions.