GSA Annual Meeting in Seattle, Washington, USA - 2017

Session No. 272
Tuesday, 24 October 2017: 9:00 AM-6:30 PM
Halls 4EF (Washington State Convention Center)

D17. Paleontology, Paleoecology/Taphonomy (Posters)

Authors will be present from 2 to 4 PM and 4:30 to 6:30 PM.
226
NEW DIRECTION IN NEOICHNOLOGY: REAL-TIME GEORADAR IMAGING OF SIMULATED BIOTURBATION
VASYLENKO, Klavdiya1, BUYNEVICH, Ilya V.1, SPARACIO, Christopher A.2 and KOPCZNSKI, Karen A.1, (1)Department of Earth & Environmental Science, Temple University, Philadelphia, PA 19122, (2)Department of Earth & Environmental Science, Temple University, 1901 N. 13th St., Beury Hall, Philadelphia, PA 19122, tug18460@temple.edu
227
TAPHONOMIC VARIATION AMONG CARBONATE AND SILICICLASTIC DEPOSITIONAL ENVIRONMENTS IN THE NORTHERN GULF OF MEXICO
REGAN, Anik, Department of Geology, Macalester College, St. Paul, MN 55105 and HARNIK, Paul G., Department of Earth and Environment, Franklin and Marshall College, Lancaster, PA 17603, aregan@umn.edu
228
DEGREE OF PYRITIZATION OF VARYING TISSUE TYPES: A TAPHONOMY EXPERIMENT
CUMMINGS, Cameron, Geological Sciences, State University of New York at Geneseo, 1 College Cir, Geneseo, NY 14454 and MACKENZIE, Lindsay, SUNY Geneseo, 1 College Circle, Geneseo, NY 14454, cmc53@geneseo.edu
229
PALEOBIOLOGY AND TAPHONOMY OF EXCEPTIONALLY PRESERVED PUTATIVE MACROALGAE FROM THE EDIACARAN ZUUN-ARTS BIOTA, WESTERN MONGOLIA
HASSELL, Keenan J., Department of Geosciences, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, 3209 N Maryland Ave, Milwaukee, WI 53211, DORNBOS, Stephen Q., Department of Geosciences, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, 3209 N. Maryland Ave., Milwaukee, WI 53201, OJI, Tatsuo, Nagoya University Museum, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Nagoya, 464-8601, Japan and GONCHIGDORJ, Sersmaa, Mongolian University of Science and Technology, Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia, khasell@uwm.edu
230
EXPERIMENTAL TAPHONOMY: THE EFFECTS OF SEDIMENT GRAIN SIZE ON MICROBIAL AND MINERAL FILM GROWTH ON TISSUES
NIGRO, Matthew, Geological Science, SUNY Geneseo, 1 College Circle, Geneseo, NY 14454 and MACKENZIE, Lindsay, SUNY Geneseo, 1 College Circle, Geneseo, NY 14454, mn8@geneseo.edu
231
USING EXPERIMENTAL TAPHONOMY TO UNDERSTAND EXCEPTIONAL PRESERVATION IN THE FOSSIL RECORD
MACKENZIE, Lindsay Ann, Geological Sciences, SUNY Geneseo, 1 College Circle, Geneseo, NY 14454, lindsay.mackenzie1105@gmail.com
232
CARBONATE PRECIPITATION DURING VERTEBRATE DECOMPOSITION IN A HYPERALKALINE AQUATIC SETTING: A CASE STUDY IN EXPERIMENTAL TAPHONOMY
ANDERSON, Bailey M., Geological Sciences, University of Missouri, 101 Geological Sciences Building, Columbia, MO 65211, PETERSON, Joseph E., Department of Geology, University of Wisconsin-Oshkosh, Harrington Hall 211, Oshkosh, WI 54901, LENCZEWSKI, Melissa, Department of Geology and Environmental Geosciences, Northern Illinois University, Davis Hall 312, DeKalb, IL 60115 and SCHIFFBAUER, James D., Department of Geological Sciences, University of Missouri, 101 Geological Sciences Building, Columbia, MO 65211, bmakmf@mail.missouri.edu
233
TUBULAR MICROFOSSILS PRESERVED BY AL-SI CLAY IN SHALLOW WATER CARBONATE FACIES OF THE POST-STURTIAN RASTHOF FORMATION (~660 MA), NORTHERN NAMIBIA
DU, Kim1, BOSAK, Tanja2, NEWMAN, Sharon2, MACDONALD, Francis A.3, LAHR, Daniel J.G.4 and PRUSS, Sara B.1, (1)Department of Geosciences, Smith College, Northampton, MA 01063, (2)Dept. of Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139, (3)Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Harvard University, 20 Oxford Street, Cambridge, MA 02138, (4)Department of Zoology, University of Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, 05508, Brazil, kdu@smith.edu
234
AUTHIGENIC MINERALOGY AND ELEMENT DISTRIBUTIONS OF VERTEBRATE MICROFOSSILS FROM THE HELL CREEK (LATEST CRETACEOUS) AND TULLOCK (PALEOCENE) FORMATIONS OF EASTERN MONTANA
WEAVER, Lucas N.1, ROGERS, Raymond R.2 and THOLE, Jeffrey T.2, (1)Biology, University of Washington, 24 Kincaid Hall, Seattle, WA 98195, (2)Geology Department, Macalester College, 1600 Grand Avenue, Saint Paul, MN 55105, lukeweav@uw.edu
235
VOLCANIC ASH AND EXCEPTIONAL FOSSIL PRESERVATION: INSIGHTS INTO TAPHONOMY AND EARLY DIAGENESIS
MAGUIRE, Evin P.1, FELDMANN, Rodney M.1, SCHWEITZER, Carrie E.2 and CASADIO, Silvio3, (1)Geology, Kent State University, 221 McGilvrey Hall, Kent, OH 44242, (2)Geology, Kent State University, 6000 Frank Avenue NW, North Canton, OH 44720, (3)Geology, Universidad Nacional de Río Negro, Río Negro, 62042, Argentina, emaguire@kent.edu
236
BUG IN A JAR: TAPHONOMIC EXPERIMENTS ALTERING BURIAL CONDITIONS OFFER INSIGHTS INTO SOFT-BODIED PRESERVATION
ANDERSON, Evan P., Geological Sciences, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211, Evozoic@gmail.com
237
INFLUENCE OF MICROBIAL BIOFILMS ON THE PRESERVATION OF SOFT TISSUE IN SNAILS
LEGAWIEC, Mary, Geological Sciences, SUNY Geneseo, 10 MacVittie Circle, Geneseo, NY 14454 and MACKENZIE, Lindsay, SUNY Geneseo, 1 College Circle, Geneseo, NY 14454, mkl5@geneseo.edu
238
DEVELOPING THE MICRITE ENVELOPE: PATTERNS OF MICROBORING INTENSITY ACROSS DEPTH AND GEOGRAPHIC LOCATION
PARSONS-HUBBARD, Karla and BANKS, Shannon, Geology Dept, Oberlin College, Oberlin College, 52 W. Lorain St, Oberlin, OH 44074, Karla.Hubbard@Oberlin.edu
239
IS IT WHAT’S ON THE INSIDE THAT COUNTS? LITHIFICATION BIAS AND COMMUNITY PALEOECOLOGY IN CARBONATE SETTINGS
DICK, Daniel, Department of Chemical and Physical Sciences, University of Toronto Mississauga, 3359 Mississauga Road, Toronto, ON L5L 1C6, Canada, daniel.dick@mail.utoronto.ca
240
EFFECTS OF EXPOSURE PRIOR TO BURIAL ON PRESERVATION OF DETAILED MORPHOLOGY IN FOSSIL NEREIS
CLARK, Timothy and MACKENZIE, Lindsay, SUNY Geneseo, 1 College Circle, Geneseo, NY 14454, tbc4@geneseo.edu
241
PRESERVATION POTENTIAL OF OWL DERIVED VERTEBRATE REMAINS FROM SAN SALVADOR ISLAND, THE BAHAMAS
STOLLER, Michael R., Department formerly known as Geosciences, Indiana University- Purdue University Fort Wayne, Fort Wayne, IN 46805, Stolmr01@students.ipfw.edu
242
ISOLATING ABIOTIC FACTORS IN VERTEBRATE BONE TAPHONOMY: A PILOT STUDY
KOY, Karen A. and BERRY, Justin, Biology, Missouri Western State University, 4525 Downs Drive, Saint Joseph, MO 64507, kkoy@missouriwestern.edu
243
TESTING LIQUID DECARBONATION TEMPERATURE AND TIME FOR δ13CORG ANALYSES IN SEDIMENTARY SECTIONS
WYNN, Peter D.1, YAGER, Joyce A.2, WEST, A. Joshua2, ROLLINS, Nick2, BERELSON, William M.2 and CORSETTI, Frank A.2, (1)Department of Earth Sciences, University of Southern California, 3651 Trousdale Pkwy, ZHS117, Los Angeles, CA 90089, (2)Department of Earth Sciences, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90089, pwynn@usc.edu
244
XRD ANALYSIS OF QUARTZ CRYSTALLINITY: A PETRIFIED WOOD UPDATE
LUMSDEN, David N., Earth Sciences, The University of Memphis, 3600 Walker Ave, Memphis, TN 38152, dlumsden@memphis.edu
245
PRELIMINARY OBSERVATIONS FROM A WOOD BIOEROSION EXPERIMENT IN MARINE AND MARGINAL MARINE SETTINGS, MOBILE BAY AREA, ALABAMA
BRUNDIN, Junstin Nathaniel, Department of Geosciences, Auburn University, 2050 BEMC, Auburn, AL 36849 and SAVRDA, Charles E., Department of Geosciences, Auburn University, 2050 Beard-Eaves Coliseum, Auburn, AL 36849, jnb0030@tigermail.auburn.edu
246
SMALL SHELLY-STYLE PRESERVATION OF FOSSILS IN LOWER TRIASSIC CARBONATES OF THE WESTERN US
STARK, Courcelle, Geosciences, Smith College, Northampton, MA 01063, TOSCA, Nicholas, Earth Sciences, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom and PRUSS, Sara B., Department of Geosciences, Smith College, Northampton, MA 01063, cstark@smith.edu
247
DISTRIBUTION OF ENCRUSTING FORAMINIFERA AT MAYAGUANA, BAHAMAS: DETERMINING ASSEMBLAGE COMPOSITION AND RELATIONSHIP TO FOOD AVAILABILITY
EUBANKS, Eric M. and LEWIS, Ronald D., Department of Geosciences, Auburn University, Auburn, AL 36849-5305, eme0012@tigermail.auburn.edu
248
BURROW MORPHOMETRY OF THE BLUE LAND CRAB (CARDISOMA GUANHUMI): A FIELD-BASED NEOICHNOLOGICAL APPROACH
SPARACIO, Christopher A.1, BUYNEVICH, Ilya V.2, KOPCZNSKI, Karen A.2, CURRAN, H. Allen3, GLUMAC, Bosiljka3, VASYLENKO, Klavdiya2 and PARK BOUSH, Lisa E.4, (1)Department of Earth & Environmental Science, Temple University, 1901 N. 13th St., Beury Hall, Philadelphia, PA 19122, (2)Department of Earth & Environmental Science, Temple University, Philadelphia, PA 19122, (3)Department of Geosciences, Smith College, Northampton, MA 01063, (4)Center for Integrative Geosciences, University of Connecticut, 354 Mansfield Road, Storrs, CT 06269-1045, csparacio@temple.edu
249
IMPACT OF BIOTURBATION ON PLEISTOCENE CARBONATE SUBTIDAL SEDIMENTS, HARRY CAY SITE, LITTLE EXUMA, BAHAMAS: INSIGHTS FROM PETROGRAPHIC ANALYSIS
BECKHAM, Abigail, GRAVELINE, Alyssa, ALVAREZ, Nathaly Reyna, GLUMAC, Bosiljka and CURRAN, H. Allen, Department of Geosciences, Smith College, Northampton, MA 01063, abeckham@smith.edu
250
BIOEROSION OF OYSTERS IN THE TYPE CAMPANIAN (UPPER CRETACEOUS) OF SOUTHWESTERN FRANCE
WILSON, Mark A., Dept of Geology, College of Wooster, 944 College Mall, Scovel Hall, Wooster, OH 44691-2363, CONRAD, Macy A., Department of Geology, The College of Wooster, 944 College Mall, Wooster, OH 44691 and TAYLOR, Paul D., Department of Earth Sciences, Natural History Museum, Cromwell Road, London, SW7 5BD, United Kingdom, mwilson@wooster.edu
251
AVIAN PREDATION TRACES AND POSSIBLE ANTI-PREDATION STRATEGIES OF THE BLUE LAND CRAB IN THE BAHAMAS: PALEOBIOLOGICAL IMPLICATIONS
BUYNEVICH, Ilya V.1, CURRAN, H. Allen2, KOPCZNSKI, Karen A.1, SPARACIO, Christopher A.3, PARK BOUSH, Lisa E.4, GLUMAC, Bosiljka2, GNIVECKI, Perry L.5 and VASYLENKO, Klavdiya1, (1)Department of Earth & Environmental Science, Temple University, Philadelphia, PA 19122, (2)Department of Geosciences, Smith College, Northampton, MA 01063, (3)Department of Earth & Environmental Science, Temple University, 1901 N. 13th St., Beury Hall, Philadelphia, PA 19122, (4)Center for Integrative Geosciences, University of Connecticut, 354 Mansfield Road, Storrs, CT 06269-1045, (5)Miami University, 571 Mosler Hall, Hamilton, OH 45011, coast@temple.edu
252
THE ROLE OF PREDATORS IN THE PALEOECOLOGY OF COLD METHANE SEEPS IN THE LATE CRETACEOUS PIERRE SEAWAY, SOUTH DAKOTA
CHEREF, Ikram, Earth & Environmental Science, CUNY- Brooklyn College, 2900 Bedford Ave, Brooklyn, NY 11210, LANDMAN, Neil H., Division of Paleontology (Invertebrates), American Museum of Natural History, Central Park West at 79th Street, New York, NY 10024-5192 and GARB, Matthew P., Earth and Environmental Sciences, Brooklyn College, 2900 Bedford Ave, Brooklyn, NY 11210, ikramcheref@gmail.com
253
DO NATICID GASTROPODS LEAVE PREDATORY MICROTRACES WHEN THEY DRILL THEIR BIVALVE PREY?
LAPIC, Whitney, Department of Geography and Geology, Mount Holyoke College, 50 College Street, South Hadley, MA 01075, SMITH, Jansen A., Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 and DIETL, Gregory P., Paleontological Research Institution, 1259 Trumansburg Rd., Ithaca, NY 14850, lapic22w@mtholyoke.edu
254
MANLY'S ALPHA FOR PREDATION SELECTIVITY: MODELS, ESTIMATION AND INTERPRETATION
HANDLEY, John C., Paleontological Research Institution, 1259 Trumansburg Road, Ithaca, NY 14850, SMITH, Jansen A., Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 and DIETL, Gregory P., Department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853, jhandley@rochester.rr.com
255
FIRST CHARACTERIZATION OF DRILLING PREDATION ON EASTER ISLAND - RAPA NUI
MARTINELLI, Julieta1, GORDILLO, Sandra2, DE ARANZAMENDI, Maria Carla3 and RIVADENEIRA, Marcelo1, (1)Facultad de Ciencias del Mar, Universidad Catolica del Norte, Coquimbo, 16861000, Chile; Paleolab, Centro de Estudios Avanzados en Zonas Aridas, Av Ossandon 877, Coquimbo, 16861000, Chile, (2)CICTERRA, CONICET, UNIVERSIDAD NACIONAL DE CORDOBA, CORDOBA, 5000, Argentina, (3)IDEA, CONICET, UNIVERSIDAD NACIONAL DE CORDOBA, CORDOBA, Argentina, martinellijulieta@gmail.com
256
INVESTIGATION OF OMNIVOROUS TROPHIC POSITION IN THE DRILLING GASTROPOD, UROSALPINX CINEREA, USING STABLE ISOTOPE ANALYSIS
KARNES, Molly E.1, CASEY, Michelle M.1, DIETL, Gregory P.2 and FALL, Leigh M.3, (1)Geosciences, Murray State University, 334 Blackburn Science Building, Murray, KY 42071, (2)Department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853, (3)Department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, SUNY College at Oneonta, Oneonta, NY 13820, mkarnes@murraystate.edu
257
USING STABLE NITROGEN AND CARBON ISOTOPE VALUES OF BIVALVE-SHELL-BOUND ORGANICS TO UNDERSTAND FOOD WEB DYNAMICS
DAS, Shibajyoti1, IVANY, Linda C.1 and JUNIUM, Christopher K.2, (1)Department of Earth Sciences, Syracuse University, Syracuse, NY 13244, (2)Department of Earth Sciences, Syracuse University, 204 Heroy Geology Laboratory, Syracuse, NY 13244, sdas100@syr.edu
258
THE OLDEST KNOWN DIGESTIVE SYSTEM CONSISTING OF BOTH PAIRED DIGESTIVE GLANDS AND A CROP FROM EXCEPTIONALLY PRESERVED TRILOBITES OF THE GUANSHAN BIOTA (EARLY CAMBRIAN, CHINA)
HOPKINS, Melanie J.1, CHEN, Feiyang2, HU, Shixue3 and ZHANG, Zhifei2, (1)Division of Paleontology, American Museum of Natural History, Central Park West at 79th Street, New York, NY 10024-5192, (2)Early Life Institute and Department of Geology, State Key Laboratory for Continental Dynamics, Northwest University, Xi'an, 710069, China, (3)Chengdu Institute of Geology and Mineral Resources, No. 2, N-3 section, 1st Ring Road, Chengdu, 610081, China, mhopkins@amnh.org
259
COENOBITA CLYPEATUS (THE TERRESTRIAL HERMIT CRAB) AND ITS PREFERENCE IN INHABITING CITTARIUM PICA (WEST INDIAN TOP) SHELLS: A TAPHONOMIC SIGNATURE FROM A COHORT STUDY FROM SAN SALVADOR ISLAND, BAHAMAS
DEVORE, Melanie L., Department of Biological and Environmental Sciences, Georgia College & State University, Milledgeville, GA 31061 and FREILE, Deborah, Earth and Environmental Sciences, New Jersey City University, 2039 John F. Kennedy Blvd., Jersey City, NJ 07305, melanie.devore@gcsu.edu
260
DIET OF ORNITHOCHEIROID PTEROSAURS INFERRED FROM STABLE CARBON ISOTOPE ANALYSIS OF TOOTH ENAMEL
MYERS, Timothy S., Roy M. Huffington Department of Earth Sciences, Southern Methodist University, Dallas, TX 75275-0395, smyers@smu.edu
261
VARIABLE BIVALVE SHELL MICROSTRUCTURE PRESERVATION IN THE CEBADA AND GRACIOSA MEMBERS OF THE CAREAGA SANDSTONE (PLIOCENE, SANTA MARIA, CA) HIGHLIGHTS NEED TO SEM ALL SPECIMENS PRIOR TO ISOTOPIC ANALYSIS
BUCZEK, Alexandra J.1, HENDY, Austin J.W.2, HOPKINS, Melanie3 and SESSA, Jocelyn3, (1)Invertebrate Paleontology, Richard Gilder Graduate School at the American Museum of Natural History, Central Park West & 79th St., New York, NY 10024, (2)Invertebrate Paleontology, Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County, 900 Exposition Blvd., Los Angeles, CA 90007, (3)Division of Paleontology, American Museum of Natural History, Central Park West at 79th Street, New York, NY 10024-5192, abuczek@amnh.org
262
LA-ICP-MS LINE SCANS OF SHELL MG/CA RATIOS AS A RAPID, COST-EFFECTIVE ALTERNATIVE TO STABLE ISOTOPE ANALYSIS FOR OYSTER SCLEROCHRONOLOGY
DURHAM, Stephen R., Paleontological Research Institution, 1259 Trumansburg Rd., Ithaca, NY 14850, GILLIKIN, David P., Department of Geology, Union College, 807 Union St, Schenectady, NY 12308, GOODWIN, David H., Department of Geosciences, Denison University, 100 Sunset Hill Drive, Granville, OH 43023 and DIETL, Gregory P., Paleontological Research Institution, 1259 Trumansburg Road, Ithaca, NY 14850, stephen.r.durham@gmail.com
263
LATITUDINAL GRADIENTS IN LIFESPAN AND GROWTH RATE FOR TWO SPECIES OF GLYCYMERIS (BIVALVIA) FROM THE MID-PLIOCENE OF THE ATLANTIC COASTAL PLAIN
MOSS, David K., Geological Sciences, University of North Carolina, 104 South Road, CB #3315, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, IVANY, Linda C., Department of Earth Sciences, Syracuse University, Syracuse, NY 13244, THOMAS, Roger D.K., Department of Earth and Environment, Franklin & Marshall College, P.O. Box 3003, Lancaster, PA 17604-3003 and SURGE, Donna, Dept. of Geological Sciences, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 104 South Road, Mitchell Hall, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, dkmoss@email.unc.edu
264
LIVE-DEAD ASSESSMENT OF THE IMPACTS OF ANTHROPOGENIC EUTROPHICATION ON BIVALVE COMMUNITIES IN THE NORTHERN GULF OF MEXICO
GRIMMELBEIN, Luke, Department of Geology, Beloit College, Beloit, WI 53511 and HARNIK, Paul G., Department of Earth and Environment, Franklin and Marshall College, Lancaster, PA 17603, grimmelbeinlj@alumni.beloit.edu
265
CHANGES IN GUILD COMPOSITION AND ENERGETIC DEMANDS THROUGHOUT THE PLIOCENE-PLEISTOCENE EXTINCTION EVENT
OPAZO, L. Felipe, Departamento de Ecología, Facultad de Ciencias Biológicas, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Alameda 340, Santiago, Chile; Division of Invertebrates Paleontology, Florida Museum of Natural History, University of Florida, 252 Dickinson Hall, 1659 Museum Road, Gainesville, FL 32611, MARQUET, Pablo A., Departamento de Ecología, Facultad de Ciencias Biológicas, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Alameda 340, Santiago, Chile; Instituto de Ecología y Biodiversidad (IEB), Casilla 653, Santiago, Chile, LABRA, Fabio A., Centro de Investigación e Innovación para el Cambio Climático, Facultad de Ciencias,, Universidad Santo Tomás, Ejército Libertador #146, Santiago, 8370003, Chile, PORTELL, Roger W., Division of Invertebrates Paleontology, Florida Museum of Natural History, University of Florida, 288 Dickinson Hall, 1659 Museum Road, Gainesville, FL 32611 and KOWALEWSKI, Michal, Division of Invertebrates Paleontology, Florida Museum of Natural History, University of Florida, 254 Dickinson Hall, 1659 Museum Road, Gainesville, FL 32611; Florida Museum of Natural History, University of Florida, 1659 Museum Road, Gainesville, FL 32611, felipe.opazo@ufl.edu
266
RELATIVELY FAST GROWTH AND MODERATE LONGEVITY FOR THE ANTARCTIC SCALLOP, ADAMUSSIUM COLBECKI, LIVING IN THE COLDEST WATERS ON EARTH
CRONIN, Kelly1, WALKER, Sally E.1, MANN, Roger2, CHUTE, A.S.3, LONG, Mathew2 and BOWSER, Samuel S.4, (1)Department of Geology, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602, (2)Virginia Institute of Marine Science, College of William and Mary, Gloucester Point, VA 23062, (3)Fisheries Service, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Association, Woods Hole, MA 02453, (4)Wadsworth Center, New York State Department of Health, Albany, NY 12201, kec75599@uga.edu
267
DISENTANGLING ANTHROPOGENIC AND ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS ON THE MORPHOMETRY OF FOSSIL AND RECENT SCALLOPS FROM THE SOUTH PACIFIC
MARTINELLI, Julieta, Paleolab, Centro de Estudios Avanzados en Zonas Aridas, Av Ossandon 877, Coquimbo, 16861000, Chile; Facultad de Ciencias del Mar, Universidad Catolica del Norte, Coquimbo, 16861000, Chile, RIVADENEIRA, Marcelo, Facultad de Ciencias del Mar, Universidad Catolica del Norte, Coquimbo, 16861000, Chile; Paleolab, Centro de Estudios Avanzados en Zonas Aridas, Av Ossandon 877, Coquimbo, 16861000, Chile, OYANADEL, Pablo, Paleolab, Centro de Estudios Avanzados en Zonas Aridas, Av Ossandon 877, Coquimbo, 16861000, Chile, BAVESTRELLO, Claudia, Facultad de Ciencias del Mar, Universidad Catolica del Norte, Coquimbo, 16861000, Chile and ACOSTA JOFRE, Maria Soledad, CONICET, IDEA, Universidad Nacional de Córdoba, Córdoba, 5000, Argentina, martinellijulieta@gmail.com
268
THE IMPACT OF RIVER IMPOUNDMENT AND OTHER HUMAN ACTIVITY ON THE SHELL SHAPE OF A NORTHERN NEW YORK FRESH WATER BIVALVE
BOWDISH, Maeve, Geology Department, St. Lawrence University, 149 Brown Hall 23 Romoda Drive, Canton, NY 13617 and NAGEL-MYERS, Judith, Geology, St. Lawrence University, 23 Romoda Drive, Canton, NY 13617, mcbowd14@stlawu.edu
270
THE SYNERGISTIC ROLE OF OXYGEN AND TEMPERATURE IN DEFINING AEROBIC SCOPE: PHYSIOLOGICAL IMPLICATIONS FOR PAST AND FUTURE OCEANS
BOAG, Thomas H.1, ELDER, Leanne2, BECK, Chelsey1, HULL, Pincelli M.3 and SPERLING, Erik A.4, (1)Department of Geological Sciences, Stanford University, 450 Serra Mall Bldg. 320, Stanford, CA 94305, (2)Department of Geology and Geophysics, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06511, (3)Geology and Geophysics, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06511, (4)Department of Geological Sciences, Stanford University, 450 Serra Mall, Bldg. 320, Palo Alto, CA 94305, tomboag@stanford.edu
271
EVIDENCE FOR TREMATODE PARASITISM IN LATE CRETACEOUS (CAMPANIAN) FRESHWATER BIVALVES FROM THE JUDITH RIVER FORMATION, MONTANA
ROGERS, Raymond R.1, CURRY ROGERS, Kristina2, ZATON, Michal P.3, THOLE, Jeffrey T.1, BAGLEY, Brian C.4 and GOODIN, James1, (1)Geology Department, Macalester College, 1600 Grand Avenue, Saint Paul, MN 55105, (2)Biology and Geology Departments, Macalester College, 1600 Grand Avenue, Saint Paul, MN 55105, (3)Faculty of Earth Sciences, University of Silesia, Bedzinska 60, Sosnowiec, PL-41-200, Poland, (4)Department of Earth Sciences, University of Minnesota, 310 Pillsbury Drive SE, Minneapolis, MN 55455, rogers@macalester.edu
272
RESTRICTED FRINGING REEF DEVELOPMENT ON THE SOUTHEAST FLORIDA CONTINENTAL REEF TRACT DURING THE LATE HOLOCENE
MODYS, Alexander B.1, TOTH, Lauren T.2, MORTLOCK, Richard A.3 and OLEINIK, Anton E.1, (1)Department of Geosciences, Florida Atlantic University, Boca Raton, FL 33431, (2)Coastal and Marine Science Center, United States Geological Survey, St. Petersburg, FL 33701, (3)Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ 08854, amodys@fau.edu
273
HEAVY METAL POLLUTION, TEST MUTATIONS, AND FORAMINIFERA ASSEMBLAGE STRESS INDICES ON SAN SALVADOR ISLAND, THE BAHAMAS
KOESTER, Bryce E.1, GIBSON, Brandt M.2 and DARROCH, Simon A.F.2, (1)Earth and Environmental Sciences, Vanderbilt University, 5726 Stevenson Center, 7th floor, Nashville, TN 37240, (2)Earth and Environmental Sciences, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 37240, bryce.koester@vanderbilt.edu
274
BIOTIC IMPACTS OF TEMPERATURE BEFORE, DURING, AND AFTER THE END-PERMIAN EXTINCTION: A MULTI-METRIC AND MULTI-SCALE APPROACH TO MODELING EXTINCTION AND RECOVERY DYNAMICS
PETSIOS, Elizabeth, Florida Museum of Natural History, University of Florida, 1659 Museum Rd., Dickinson Hall, Gainesville, FL 32611, THOMPSON, Jeffrey R., Department of Earth Sciences, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90089-0740, PIETSCH, Carlie, Paleontological Research Institution, 1259 Trumansburg Road, Ithaca, NY 14850 and BOTTJER, David J., Department of Earth Sciences, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90089, epetsios@floridamuseum.ufl.edu
275
HIGH-RESOLUTION PALEOENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS OF A PLIO-PLEISTOCENE MARINE SUCCESSION IN CALIFORNIA
HENDY, Austin J.W., Invertebrate Paleontology, Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County, 900 Exposition Blvd., Los Angeles, CA 90007, ahendy@nhm.org
276
HABITAT HETEROGENEITY, PALEOECOLOGY, AND LOCAL BIODIVERSITY OF AN UPPER ORDOVICIAN MOUNDED HARDGROUND:IMPLICATIONS FOR BIODIVERSIFICATION
PATON, Timothy, Department of Geology, University of Cincinnati, 345 Clifton Court, Cincinnati, OH 45221, BRETT, Carlton E., Department of Geology, University of Cincinnati, Geology-Physics Builging, Cincinnati, OH 45221 and KAMPOURIS, George, Cincinnati Museum Center, Cincinnati, OH 45203, patontr@mail.uc.edu
277
DEVELOPING AN EVOLUTIONARY NICHE MODEL FOR TROPICAL SOUTH AMERICA
WHEATLEY, Alexander A., Division of Earth and Ocean Sciences, Nicholas School of the Environment, Duke University, 450 Research Drive, Durham, NC 27708, FRITZ, Sherilyn C., Earth and Atmospheric Sciences Department, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE 68588 and BAKER, Paul A., Division of Earth and Ocean Sciences, Duke University, Old Chemistry Building Room 103, Durham, NC 27708, alexander.wheatley@duke.edu
278
HABITAT SELECTIVITY OF BENTHIC COMMUNITIES IN MICROBIAL REEF ECOSYSTEMS FOLLOWING THE LATE PERMIAN MASS EXTINCTION EVENT
FOSTER, William Joseph1, LEHRMANN, Daniel J.2, YU, Meiyi3, JI, Li3 and MARTINDALE, Rowan C.1, (1)Jackson School of Geosciences, University of Texas at Austin, 2275 Speedway, Austin, TX 78712, (2)Geosciences, Trinity University, One Trinity Place, San Antonio, TX 78212, (3)Resource and Environment Engineering, Guizhou University, Guiyang, 550025, China, w.j.foster@gmx.co.uk
279
HEART COCKLE WINDOWS AND TRANSLUCENCY: IMPLICATIONS FOR ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES
CHERTOK, Marley A., The Patrick Center for Environmental Research, The Academy of Natural Sciences of Drexel University, 1900 Benjamin Franklin Pkwy, Philadelphia, PA 19103; Department of Earth and Environmental Science, Temple University, 1801 North Broad St, Philadelphia, PA 19122, GANNON, Michelle, Department of Biodiversity, Earth and Environmental Sciences, Drexel University, 1900 Benjamin Franklin Pkwy, Philadelphia, PA 19103 and ROSENBERG, Gary, Department of Malocology, The Academy of Natural Sciences of Drexel University, 1900 Benjamin Franklin Pkwy, Philadelphia, PA 19103; Department of Biodiversity, Earth and Environmental Sciences, Drexel University, 1900 Benjamin Franklin Pkwy, Philadelphia, PA 19103, marleychertok@gmail.com
280
SUBSTRATE RELATIONSHIP GUIDED MOLLUSCAN BODY-SIZE RESPONSE TO CLIMATIC FLUCTUATION DURING THE PAST 66 MA
CHATTOPADHYAY, Debarati and CHATTOPADHYAY, Devapriya, Department of Earth Sciences, Indian Institute of Science Education and Research (IISER) Kolkata, Mohanpur, 741246, India, dc14rs033@iiserkol.ac.in
281
PUTTING EVOLUTIONARY PATTERNS IN CONTEXT: A COMPARISON OF THE BIVALVE NUCULA DURING GREEN- AND ICEHOUSE CLIMATES
SLATTERY, Joshua S.1, HARRIES, Peter J.2, JARRETT, Matt B.1, SANDNESS, Ashley L.3, PHILLIPS, George E.4 and MINOR, Keith5, (1)School of Geosciences, University of South Florida, 4202 East Fowler Ave, NES 107, Tampa, FL 33620, (2)Department of Marine, Earth, and Atmospheric Sciences, NC State University, 2800 Faucette Drive, Jordan Hall, Campus Box 8208, Raleigh, NC 27695-8208, (3)Tampa, FL 33613, (4)Paleontology, Mississippi Museum of Natural Science, 2148 Riverside Drive, Jackson, MS 39202-1353, (5)Dallas, TX 75116, dinohyus@gmail.com
282
UPDATE ON THE POTENTIAL EFFECTS OF OCEAN ACIDIFICATION ON ANTARCTIC MARINE BIVALVES
WEBSTER, Claire1, WALKER, Sally E.1, TEETER, William H.2 and BOWSER, Samuel S.3, (1)Department of Geology, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602, (2)Geology, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602, (3)Wadsworth Center, New York State Department of Health, Albany, NY 12201, claire.webster25@uga.edu
283
ECOLOGY AND ENDOSYMBIONT DIVERSITY OF SIX CO-OCCURRING BIVALVES (BIVALVIA: LUCINIDAE) FROM AN ANTHROPOGENICALLY-IMPACTED TIDAL FLAT ON SUGARLOAF KEY, FLORIDA KEYS
FORTIER, Chantelle M.1, PATERSON, Audrey2 and ENGEL, Annette Summers1, (1)Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996, (2)Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996; Department of Earth and Planetary Science, University of Tennessee, 1412 Circle Drive, Knoxville, TN 37916, cfortier@vols.utk.edu
284
HELICOPRION TOOTH WHORLS AS PALEOTHERMOMETRY PROXIES FOR THE PERMIAN PHOSPHORIA SEA
HAYES, Matthew B1, HERBERT, Gregory S.1 and TAPANILA, Leif2, (1)School of Geosciences, University of South Florida, 4202 East Fowler Ave., Tampa, FL 33620, (2)Department of Geosciences, Idaho State University, 921 S. 8th Ave, Pocatello, ID 83209-8072; Earth Science Division, Idaho Museum of Natural History, Pocatello, ID 83201, mbhayes@mail.usf.edu
285
ON THE IMPORTANCE OF INCOMPLETE SAMPLING IN PALAEONTOLOGICAL AND PHYLOGENETIC APPROACHES TO ESTIMATING SPECIATION AND EXTINCTION RATES
WARNOCK, Rachel C.M.1, HEATH, Tracy A.2 and STADLER, Tanja1, (1)Department of Biosystems Sciences & Engineering, ETH Zurich, Basel, 4058, Switzerland, (2)Dept. Ecology, Evolution, & Organismal Biology, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011, rachel.warnock@bsse.ethz.ch
286
A SIMULATION REVIEW OF METHODS FOR ESTIMATING MACROEVOLUTIONARY RATES USING FOSSIL DATA
SOUL, Laura C. and HUNT, Gene, Department of Paleobiology, Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History, NHB MRC 121, P.O. Box 37012, Washington, DC 20013-7012, SoulL@si.edu
287
AN OSTRACODE FAUNA FROM THE CLAYTON FORMATION (PALEOCENE) AND ANALYSIS OF SAMPLE-STANDARDIZED DIVERSITIES ACROSS THE K/PG BOUNDARY IN THE US COASTAL PLAIN
THOMPSON, Carmi Milagros, Department of Natural History, Florida Museum of Natural History, Gainesville, FL 32611, FERNANDES MARTINS, Maria João, Department of Paleobiology, Smithsonian Institution, NMNH, Smithsonian Institution [NHB, MRC 121], PO Box 37012, Washington, DC 20113-7012 and HUNT, Gene, Department of Paleobiology, Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History, NHB MRC 121, P.O. Box 37012, Washington, DC 20013-7012, cmthompson@email.wm.edu
288
COLD METHANE SEEPS AS POSSIBLE REFUGES FROM ASH FALLS: EVIDENCE FROM THE UPPER CRETACEOUS PIERRE SHALE, SOUTH DAKOTA
BROPHY, Shannon K.1, GARB, Matthew P.1, LANDMAN, Neil H.2, BREZINA, Jamie3, NAUJOKAITYTE, Jone1 and HAFNER, Brianna P.1, (1)Earth and Environmental Sciences, Brooklyn College, 2900 Bedford Ave, Brooklyn, NY 11210, (2)Division of Paleontology, American Museum of Natural History, Central Park West at 79th St, New York, NY 10024, (3)Dept. of Mining Engineering, South Dakota School of Mines & Technology, Rapid City, SD 57701, skbrophy94@gmail.com
289
EVIDENCE FOR A GRAPTOLITE EXTINCTION EVENT LINKED TO SEA-LEVEL FALL AT THE ORDOVICIAN-SILURIAN BOUNDARY
LOXTON, Jason, Mathematics, Physics, and Geology, Cape Breton University, 1250 Grand Lake Rd., Sydney, NS B1P 6L2, Canada and MELCHIN, Michael, Dept. of Earth Sciences, St. Francis Xavier Univ, Antigonish, NS B2G 2V5, Canada, jason_loxton@cbu.ca
290
PALEOECOLOGY AS A CAPSTONE COURSE FOR GEOSCIENCES: AN INTENSIVE, FIELD-BASED APPROACH
MORGAN, Ryan, Department of Chemistry, Geosciences, and Physics, Tarleton State University, Stephenville, rmorgan@tarleton.edu
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