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Found 92 matches
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  1. ... , each center would erupt explosively, forming tuff cones composed of pyroclastic flows, surges and debris avalanche deposits in which block craters occur proximally to vents. Centers then issued domes and flows. Four of these occur along a northwest trend and once formed a chain of overlapping domes ...
  2. ... and S in soils persists, as seen in alpha-proton X-ray spectrometry data collected from a shallow trench dug by the Spirit rover on sol 140 at Gusev Crater. Naturally occurring members of the MgSO4•nH2O series on Earth are epsomite (MgSO4•7H2O), hexahydrite (MgSO4•6H2O), and kieserite (MgSO4•H2O) but ...
  3. ... of a great spectrum of unusual carbonate and evaporite-precipitating environments. Lakes Gnotuk, Bullenmerri and Keilambete occupy small, deep craters in the central part of the Volcanic Plains. The lakes are topographically closed, and because of their small drainage basins and limited groundwater ...
  4. ... allows them to gain experience studying various volcanic rocks. To view volcanic rocks, we make stops in the Absaroka Mountains, Yellowstone NP, and Craters of the Moon NM. To view areas with classic geologic structures, we make stops in the Big Horn Mountains, Grand Teton National Park, Gros Ventre ...
  5. ... hot (>200°C) highly saline, metal-rich, hydrocarbon-bearing brines. The source of the hot quartz-forming brines is assumed in the center of the crater structure. Trace hydrocarbon being present in some quartz inclusions may be derived from cracking of pre-impact organic matter. Remobilization of ...
  6. ... a lunar-like planet with hints of terrestrial similarities. The view from MGS is that Mars is neither the Moon with an atmosphere nor the Earth with craters, but a planet with its own unique and strange history. From a distant past when liquid water pooled in depressions on the surface that acted as ...
  7. ... oceanic impacts (~10-km-diameter bolide) penetrate well into the upper mantle (~40-km depth), eject mostly water or water vapor from the transient crater, and generate megatsunami (~4 km initial height) capable of coastal stratigraphic effects on a global scale. Impact-generated megatsunami, consequently ...
  8. ... mass and volume acquired during the June 11 flyby give Phoebe a bulk density of ~1.6 g/cc, consistent with a mix of rock, ice, and organic material. Craters cover the moon and range from 100 km diameter down to resolution limits (~50 m). Landslides have exposed bright patches of nearly pure water ice ...
  9. ... dust. Small amounts of secondary minerals (clay, carbonate, sulfate, halide) in martian meteorites formed by reaction with subsurface fluids. Gusev Crater rocks analyzed by Spirit are picritic basalts, having compositions distinct from TES surface units but similar mineral compositions. These rocks ...
  10. ... abundance of plant groups (Vajda et al. 2001). New Zealand, located in high south latitudes at the time of impact and far from the Chixculub crater site, provides an invaluable opportunity to test the global effects of the bolide impact on ecosystem biodiversity. Nichols, D.J. & Johnson, K.R., 2003 ...

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